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Journal of Interactive Media

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Volume 16, Issue 2

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Human-Machine Integration as Support Relation: Individual and Task-Related Hybrid Systems in Industrial Production

Robert Weidner
  • Corresponding author
  • 26554 Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Laboratory of Manufacturing Technologies, Holstenhofweg 85, Hamburg, 22043, Germany
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/ Andreas Argubi-Wollesen
  • 26554 Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Laboratory of Manufacturing Technologies, Holstenhofweg 85, Hamburg, 22043, Germany
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/ Athanasios Karafillidis
  • 26554 Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Laboratory of Manufacturing Technologies, Holstenhofweg 85, Hamburg, 22043, Germany
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/ Bernward Otten
  • 26554 Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Laboratory of Manufacturing Technologies, Holstenhofweg 85, Hamburg, 22043, Germany
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Published Online: 2017-08-10 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/icom-2017-0019

Abstract

One of the greatest societal challenges right now can be seen in the design of the interaction between human and technology. Especially in recent years this has become more intense. In almost all life situations, we are already supported or assisted by technology. Such systems come in various forms and characteristics. This paper will report on an ongoing research project named smartASSIST which aims to establish methods for the development of wearable systems for physical support as well as exemplary supporting technologies. The research is based upon a theoretical foundation of human-machine support relations which leads to the conceptual approach of constructing Human-Hybrid-Robot (HHR) systems.

Keywords: Support Technologies; interdisciplinary Approach; participatory Approach; Human Aspects; Human Machine Interaction; Wearable Technologies

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About the article

Robert Weidner

Robert Weidner, Dr.-Ing., studied mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg. He received his Phd at the Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg 2014. Currently he leads the interdisciplinary junior research group smartASSIST which is founded by the Germany Ministry of Education and Research. Within this project, technical support systems as well as concepts for human machine interaction and methods for the developement are in focus.

Andreas Argubi-Wollesen

Andreas Argubi-Wollesen studied Human Movement Science, Pedagogy and German at the University of Hamburg. He specialized in Biomechanics and works currently as a member of the interdiciplinary research team smartASSIST at the Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Germany. His main research area is the development of tools for the biomechanical analysis of technical support systems such as exoskeletons.

Athanasios Karafillidis

Athanasios Karafillidis, Dr. phil., studied sociology at the University of Wuppertal and received his Phd from the University of Witten/Herdecke. In his thesis he developed a theory of social forms, which allows to model indeterminate processes of communication and difference. Currently he works as a post-doc at the Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces in Hamburg in the faculty of engineering and is preoccupied with the design and contexts of wearable technical systems, i.e. exoskeletons and other human-machine-hybrids.

Bernward Otten

Bernward Otten, M.Sc. has studied Medical Technology at the Technical University of Munich. In the course of his masterthesis at Fraunhofer IPA in Stuttgart he was introduced to the field of exoskeletal support systems and since 2015 works as a researcher at the Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces on the design and the control of exoskeletal support systems.


Published Online: 2017-08-10

Published in Print: 2017-08-28


This research (project “smart ASSIST – Smart, AdjuStable, Soft and Intelligent Support Technologies”, funding number 16SV7114) is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) program for an interdisciplinary build-up of competence in human machine interaction against the background of demographic changes.


Citation Information: i-com, Volume 16, Issue 2, Pages 143–152, ISSN (Online) 2196-6826, ISSN (Print) 1618-162X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/icom-2017-0019.

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