Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Editor-in-Chief: Merrick, Joav

Editorial Board Member: Birch, Diana ML / Blum, Robert W. / Greydanus, MD, Dr. HC (Athens), Donald E. / Hardoff, Daniel / Kerr, Mike / Levy, Howard B / Morad, Mohammed / Omar, Hatim A. / de Paul, Joaquin / Rydelius, Per-Anders / Shek, Daniel T.L. / Sher, Leo / Silber, Tomas J. / Towns, Susan / Urkin, Jacob / Verhofstadt-Deneve, Leni / Zeltzer, Lonnie / Tenenbaum, Ariel

6 Issues per year


CiteScore 2016: 0.71

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 0.381
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 0.383

Online
ISSN
2191-0278
See all formats and pricing
More options …
Volume 25, Issue 4 (Dec 2013)

Issues

Evaluation of the project P.A.T.H.S. (extension phase) based on the perspective of the program participants

Daniel T.L. Shek
  • Corresponding author
  • Chair Professor of Applied Social Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Room HJ407, Core H, Hunghom, Hong Kong, P.R. China
  • Department of Applied Social Sciences, Centre for Innovative Programmes for Adolescents and Families, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P.R. China
  • Department of Social Work, East China Normal University, Shanghai, P.R. China
  • Kiang Wu Nursing College of Macau, Macau, P.R. China
  • Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Kentucky Children’s Hospital, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY, USA
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Rachel C.F. Sun
Published Online: 2013-03-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2013-0038

Abstract

Subjective outcome evaluation data were collected from 236 schools (n=87,943 students) after students had participated in the Tier 1 Program in the second year of the Extension Phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong. Using schools as the units of analysis, results showed that the program and implementers were perceived in a positive manner and approximately four-fifths of the participants regarded the program as helpful to them. There were some significant grade differences in the subjective outcome evaluation findings with small effect size. Multiple regression analyses showed that whereas perceived qualities of the program positively predicted perceived effectiveness of the program, perceived qualities of implementers negatively predicted program effectiveness. The present study suggests that irrespective of cohorts at different times, junior secondary school students perceived the program to be beneficial to them. The theoretical and practical implications of the present findings are discussed.

Keywords: client satisfaction approach; Hong Kong; Project P.A.T.H.S.; subjective outcome evaluation

References

  • 1.

    Shek DTL, Ma CMS, Tang CYP. Predictors of subjective outcome evaluation findings in a positive youth development program in Hong Kong. Int J Disabil Hum Dev 2011;10:249–55.Google Scholar

  • 2.

    Shek DTL, Sun RCF, Merrick J. Training programs and implementation process of positive youth development programs. Int J Adolesc Med Health 2011;23:303–4.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 3.

    Shek DTL. Quality of life research: responses to emerging issues in a changing world. Soc Indic Res 2011;100:371–4.Web of ScienceCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • 4.

    Shek DTL, Sun RCF. Participants’ evaluation of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: Are findings based on different datasets consistent? ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/187450. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 5.

    Catalano RF, Berglund ML, Ryan JAM, Lonczak HS, Hawkins JD. Positive youth development in the United States: research findings on evaluations of positive youth development programs. Available at: URL: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/PositiveYouthDev99/. Accessed on June 21, 2012.

  • 6.

    Shek DTL, Ma CMS. Impact of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in the junior secondary school years: objective outcome evaluation based on eight waves of longitudinal data. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/170345. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 7.

    Shek DTL, Yu L. Longitudinal impact of the Project P.A.T.H.S. on adolescent risk behavior: what happened after five years. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/316029. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 8.

    Weinbach RW. Evaluating social work services and programs. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 2005.Google Scholar

  • 9.

    Schalock RL. Outcome-based evaluation, 2nd ed. New York: Kluwer Academic, 2001.Google Scholar

  • 10.

    Fitzpatrick R, Hopkins A. Problem in the conceptual framework of patient satisfaction research: an empirical exploration. Sociol Health Ill 1983;5:297–311.CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • 11.

    Woodside A, Frey L, Daly R. Linking service quality, customer satisfaction and behavioral intention. J Health Care Marketing 1989;9:5–17.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 12.

    Yi Y. A critical review of consumer satisfaction. In: Zeithaml VA, editor. Review of marketing 1989. Chicago, IL: American Marketing Association, 1991:68–123.Google Scholar

  • 13.

    Grigoroudis E, Siskos Y. Customer satisfaction evaluation: methods for measuring and implementing service quality. Boston, MA: Springer, 2010.Google Scholar

  • 14.

    Shek DTL, Sun RCF. Secondary data analyses of subjective outcome evaluation findings of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong. ScientificWorldJ 2010;10:2101–11.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 15.

    Shek DTL, Ma HK. Subjective outcome evaluation of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: findings based on the perspective of the program participants. ScientificWorldJ 2007;7:47–55.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 16.

    Ma HK, Shek DTL. Subjective outcome evaluation of a positive youth development program in Hong Kong: profiles and correlates. ScientificWorldJ 2010;10:192–200.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 17.

    Shek DTL, Sun RCF. Evaluation of Project P.A.T.H.S. (Secondary 1 Program) by the program participants: findings based on the full implementation phase. Adolescence 2008;43:807–22.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 18.

    Shek DTL, Lee TY, Siu AMH, Ma HK. Convergence of subjective outcome and objective outcome evaluation findings: insights based on the Project P.A.T.H.S. ScientificWorldJ 2007;7:258–67.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 19.

    Shek DTL. Subjective outcome and objective outcome evaluation findings: insights from a Chinese context. Res Soc Work Pract 2010;20:293–301.CrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • 20.

    Shek DTL, Ma HK, Merrick J. Editorial: effectiveness of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong: evaluation based on different strategies and different studies over time. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/427801. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 21.

    Dorman JP. Statistical tests conducted with school environment data: the effect of teachers being clustered in schools. Learning Environ Res 2009;12:85–99.Google Scholar

  • 22.

    Fraser BJ. Classroom learning environments. In: Abell SK, Lederman NG, editors. Handbook of research on science education. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum, 2007:103–24.Google Scholar

  • 23.

    von Eye A, Bergman LR. Research strategies in developmental psychopathology: dimensional identity and the person-oriented approach. Dev Psychopathol 2003;15:553–80.PubMedGoogle Scholar

  • 24.

    Royse D. Research methods in social work. Pacific Grove, CA: Thomson Brooks/Cole, 2004.Google Scholar

  • 25.

    Shek DTL, Ma CMS. Program implementers’ evaluation of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: findings based on different datasets over time. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/918437. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 26.

    Shek DTL. Secondary data analyses of subjective outcome evaluation data based on nine databases. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/346369. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 27.

    Law BMF, Shek DTL. Process evaluation of a positive youth development program in Hong Kong based on different cohorts. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/736730. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 28.

    Shek DTL, Yu L. Interim evaluation of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: findings based on different datasets. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/132826. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 29.

    Shek DTL. Qualitative evaluation of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: an integration of findings based on program implementers. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/591816. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 30.

    Shek DTL, Sun RCF. Qualitative evaluation of Project P.A.T.H.S.: an integration of findings based on program participants. ScientificWorldJournal 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/528483. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 31.

    Shek DTL, Sun RCF. Evaluation of the Project P.A.T.H.S. based on students’ weekly diaries: findings from eight datasets. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/354254. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 32.

    Shek DTL. Evaluation of a positive youth development program based on the repertory grid test. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/372752. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 33.

    Shek DTL, Lee TY. Helping adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: subjective outcome evaluation based on different cohorts. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/694018. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

  • 34.

    Shek DTL, Sun RCF. Epilogue: the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong: lessons learned and implications for positive youth development programs. ScientificWorldJ 2012. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/687536. Accessed on March 16, 2012.Crossref

About the article

Corresponding author: Professor Daniel T.L. Shek, PhD, FHKPS, BBS, JP, Chair Professor of Applied Social Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Room HJ407, Core H, Hunghom, Hong Kong, P.R. China, E-mail:


Received: 2012-05-06

Accepted: 2012-06-03

Published Online: 2013-03-01

Published in Print: 2013-12-01


Citation Information: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN (Online) 2191-0278, ISSN (Print) 0334-0139, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2013-0038.

Export Citation

©2013 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston. Copyright Clearance Center

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in