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International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Editor-in-Chief: Merrick, Joav

Editorial Board Member: Birch, Diana ML / Blum, Robert W. / Greydanus, MD, Dr. HC (Athens), Donald E. / Hardoff, Daniel / Kerr, Mike / Levy, Howard B / Morad, Mohammed / Omar, Hatim A. / de Paul, Joaquin / Rydelius, Per-Anders / Shek, Daniel T.L. / Sher, Leo / Silber, Tomas J. / Towns, Susan / Urkin, Jacob / Verhofstadt-Deneve, Leni / Zeltzer, Lonnie / Tenenbaum, Ariel

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CiteScore 2016: 0.71

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2191-0278
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Volume 25, Issue 4 (Dec 2013)

Issues

Evaluation of project P.A.T.H.S. by the program implementers: findings based on the extension phase

Daniel T.L. Shek
  • Corresponding author
  • Chair Professor of Applied Social Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Room HJ407, Core H, Hunghom, Hong Kong, P.R. China
  • Department of Applied Social Sciences, Centre for Innovative Programmes for Adolescents and Families, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P.R. China
  • Department of Social Work, East China Normal University, Shanghai, P.R. China
  • Kiang Wu Nursing College of Macau, Macau, P.R. China
  • Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Kentucky Children’s Hospital, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY, USA
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Rachel C.F. Sun
Published Online: 2013-03-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2013-0039

Abstract

A total of 236 schools participated in the Project P.A.T.H.S. in the 2010/2011 school year. After completion of the Tier 1 Program, subjective outcome evaluation data were collected from 3275 program implementers. Based on the consolidated findings based on schools as units, results showed that participants had positive perceptions of the program, implementers, and benefits of the program. More than four-fifths of the implementers regarded the program as helpful to the program participants. Multiple regression analysis revealed that perceived qualities of the program and the program implementers predicted perceived effectiveness of the program. Grade differences were not significant. The present study provides additional support for the effectiveness of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong.

Keywords: Chinese adolescents; program implementers; Project P.A.T.H.S.; subjective outcome evaluation

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About the article

Corresponding author: Professor Daniel T.L. Shek, PhD, FHKPS, BBS, JP, Chair Professor of Applied Social Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Room HJ407, Core H, Hunghom, Hong Kong, P.R. China, E-mail:


Received: 2012-05-10

Accepted: 2012-06-10

Published Online: 2013-03-01

Published in Print: 2013-12-01


Citation Information: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN (Online) 2191-0278, ISSN (Print) 0334-0139, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2013-0039.

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©2013 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston. Copyright Clearance Center

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