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International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Editor-in-Chief: Merrick, Joav

Editorial Board: Birch, Diana ML / Blum, Robert W. / Greydanus, MD, Dr. HC (Athens), Donald E. / Hardoff, Daniel / Kerr, Mike / Levy, Howard B / Morad, Mohammed / Omar, Hatim A. / de Paul, Joaquin / Rydelius, Per-Anders / Shek, Daniel T.L. / Sher, Leo / Silber, Tomas J. / Towns, Susan / Urkin, Jacob / Verhofstadt-Deneve, Leni / Zeltzer, Lonnie / Tenenbaum, Ariel


CiteScore 2018: 0.79

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.350
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.476

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2191-0278
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Meningococcal disease awareness and meningoccocal vaccination among Greek students planning to travel abroad

Androula Pavli
  • Travel Medicine Office, Department for Interventions in Healthcare Facilities, Hellenic Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Athens, Greece
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Panagiotis Katerelos
  • Department for Interventions in Health Care Facilities, Hellenic Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Athens, Greece
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Helena C. Maltezou
  • Corresponding author
  • Department for Interventions in Health-Care Facilities, Hellenic Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 3-5 Agrafon Street, Athens, 15123 Greece, Phone: 30-210-5212-175
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2017-06-09 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2017-0016

Abstract

Objective

Students living in dormitories are at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Our aim was to evaluate Greek students planning to study abroad about their level of meningococcal disease awareness and attitudes and practices towards meningococcal vaccination.

Methods

We studied 231 Greek ERASMUS students using a questionnaire.

Results

Students had a mean number of 4.1 correct answers out of six questions. In particular 66.5% 79.3%, 72.3% and 82.3% of them answered correctly about the etiology, transmission, epidemiology and treatment of meningococcal disease, respectively. Only 23.4% were vaccinated, whereas 14.7% were planning to do so in the near future. Students who answered correctly ≥5 questions were more likely to be male, vaccinated against meningococcal meningitis and science students.

Conclusion

We found an overall good level of knowledge about meningococcal disease among Greek students planning to study or already studying abroad. Knowledge about meningococcal disease was associated with vaccine uptake. However, vaccination rate against meningococcal disease was low.

Keywords: awareness; disease; meningitis; students; travelers; vaccine

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About the article

Received: 2017-01-29

Accepted: 2017-03-22

Published Online: 2017-06-09


Funding: This study was supported by Novartis Vaccines now Glaxo Smith Kline.

Competing interests: Nothing to declare (all authors).


Citation Information: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 20170016, ISSN (Online) 2191-0278, ISSN (Print) 0334-0139, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2017-0016.

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