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International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Editor-in-Chief: Merrick, Joav

Editorial Board: Birch, Diana ML / Blum, Robert W. / Greydanus, MD, Dr. HC (Athens), Donald E. / Hardoff, Daniel / Kerr, Mike / Levy, Howard B / Morad, Mohammed / Omar, Hatim A. / de Paul, Joaquin / Rydelius, Per-Anders / Shek, Daniel T.L. / Sher, Leo / Silber, Tomas J. / Towns, Susan / Urkin, Jacob / Verhofstadt-Deneve, Leni / Zeltzer, Lonnie / Tenenbaum, Ariel


CiteScore 2018: 0.79

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.350
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.476

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2191-0278
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HEEADSSS up: pediatric residents’ confidence and practice in adolescent health care before and after mandatory adolescent medicine rotations in Thailand

Rosawan S. Areemit
  • Corresponding author
  • Division of Ambulatory Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
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/ Boonying Manaboriboon
  • Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Supinya In-iw
  • Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Jiraporn Arunakul / Wirote Areekul
  • Phramongkutklao College of Medicine, Department of Military and Community Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2017-11-23 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2017-0149

Abstract

Background

The field of adolescent medicine is an emerging area of specialization in Thailand. Adolescent medicine was made a mandatory rotation in general pediatric residency training programs for the class of 2013.

Objective

This study aims to explore the difference in pediatric residents’ confidence and the frequency in providing aspects of care to adolescents.

Subjects

Participants included two groups of pediatric residents; the former curriculum group (FCG) in 2012 and the mandatory curriculum group (MCG) in 2015.

Methods

Participants in this cross-sectional study answered a 41-item self-administered questionnaire and results were analyzed by descriptive statistics.

Results

There were 91 participants, 50.05% were in the MCG. The FCG reported a higher percentage of feeling “more confident” on physical examination (p = 0.031, V = 0.23) and growth assessment (p = 0.040, V = 0.22). The MCG reported a higher percentage of “more frequently” carrying out the psychosocial assessment (p = 0.035, V = 0.22).

Conclusion

The FCG reported higher levels of confidence than the MCG in most of the items, while the MCG reported higher levels of frequency in providing care. The psychosocial (HEEADSSS) assessment, a key aspect of the adolescent clinical visit, was the item that the MCG reported doing more frequently than the FCG which remained significant when only the postgraduate year of training (PGY) 4s were compared.

Keywords: adolescent; curriculum; health care; health supervision; pediatric residency; Thailand

References

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About the article

Received: 2017-08-26

Accepted: 2017-09-25

Published Online: 2017-11-23


Conflict of interest statement: The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

Authors’ contributionsRosawan S. Areemit contributed to the conception and design of the study, survey design, acquisition, analysis and interpretation of the data and drafting and revision of the article.Boonying Manaboriboon contributed to the design of the study, survey design, acquisition, interpretation of the data and drafting revision of the article.Supinya In-iw contributed to the design of the study, survey design, acquisition, interpretation of the data and drafting revision of the article.Jiraporn P. Arunakul contributed to the survey design, acquisition, interpretation of the data and revision of the article.Wirote Areekul contributed to the design of the study, survey design, data acquisition, interpretation of the data and revision of the article.


Citation Information: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 20170149, ISSN (Online) 2191-0278, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2017-0149.

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