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International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Editor-in-Chief: Merrick, Joav

Editorial Board: Birch, Diana ML / Blum, Robert W. / Greydanus, MD, Dr. HC (Athens), Donald E. / Hardoff, Daniel / Kerr, Mike / Levy, Howard B / Morad, Mohammed / Omar, Hatim A. / de Paul, Joaquin / Rydelius, Per-Anders / Shek, Daniel T.L. / Sher, Leo / Silber, Tomas J. / Towns, Susan / Urkin, Jacob / Verhofstadt-Deneve, Leni / Zeltzer, Lonnie / Tenenbaum, Ariel


CiteScore 2018: 0.79

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.350
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.476

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2191-0278
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Environmental perceptions and its associations with physical fitness and body composition in adolescents: longitudinal results from the LabMed Physical Activity Study

André Oliveira
  • Corresponding author
  • Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
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/ Luis Lopes
  • Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
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/ Sandra Abreu
  • Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
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/ Carla Moreira
  • Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
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/ Pedro Silva
  • Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
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/ César Agostinis-Sobrinho
  • Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
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/ José Oliveira-Santos
  • Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
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/ Jorge Mota
  • Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
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/ Rute Santos
  • Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
  • Early Start Research Institute, School of Education, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia
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Published Online: 2018-04-10 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2017-0205

Abstract

Background

The environmental correlates have been extensively studied in the last years, but most associations with physical fitness (PF) and body composition have been cross-sectional in nature.

Objective

This study aimed to determine if adolescents’ environmental perceptions associated with PF and body composition in a 2-year follow-up.

Subjects

Participants were 583 adolescents aged 12–18 years (299 girls) from the LabMed Physical Activity Study.

Methods

PF and body composition were assessed with the protocols of the ALPHA health-related fitness battery and environmental perceptions with the ALPHA environmental questionnaire. Linear regression models were used to determine the associations between environmental perceptions at baseline and PF and anthropometric measures at follow-up.

Results

Results showed that perceptions of distant facilities at baseline were associated with lower fitness at follow-up in boys. Also, boys’ lower study environment perceptions at baseline were associated with higher body composition at follow-up. Positive perceptions of a pleasant environment at baseline were associated with better fitness at follow-up in boys. Additionally, girls’ positive bike lanes availability and esthetics perceptions at baseline were associated with better body composition at follow-up.

Conclusion

Positive environmental perceptions at baseline are associated with better PF and body composition at follow-up.

Keywords: ALPHA; body mass index; fitness; youth

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About the article

Received: 2017-11-26

Accepted: 2018-01-15

Published Online: 2018-04-10


Conflicts of interest: No conflicts of interest were reported by the authors of this paper.

Funding source: This study was supported by FCT grant: BPD/102381/2014. The Research Centre on Physical Activity, Health and Leisure (CIAFEL) is supported by UID/DTP/00617/2013.


Citation Information: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 20170205, ISSN (Online) 2191-0278, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2017-0205.

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