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International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Editor-in-Chief: Merrick, Joav

Editorial Board: Birch, Diana ML / Blum, Robert W. / Greydanus, MD, Dr. HC (Athens), Donald E. / Hardoff, Daniel / Kerr, Mike / Levy, Howard B / Morad, Mohammed / Omar, Hatim A. / de Paul, Joaquin / Rydelius, Per-Anders / Shek, Daniel T.L. / Sher, Leo / Silber, Tomas J. / Towns, Susan / Urkin, Jacob / Verhofstadt-Deneve, Leni / Zeltzer, Lonnie / Tenenbaum, Ariel


CiteScore 2018: 0.79

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.350
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.476

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2191-0278
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Hemihyperplasia/hemihypertrophy in adolescents: prospective international study

Michael Vaiman
  • Department of Otolaryngology, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
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/ Phillip Shilco
  • “Briut HaShen” Dental Health Clinic, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Department of Anatomy, Alexander Muss High School in Israel (AMHSI) affiliated with Alexander Muss Institute for Israel Education (AMIIE), Hod HaSharon 45102, Israel
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/ Yulia Roitblat
  • Department of Sciences, Yohana Jabotinsky Youth Town for Sciences and Arts Six-Year Comprehensive School, Beer Yakov, Israel
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/ Lilia Nehuliaieva / Sari Rosenberg
  • Department of Anatomy, Alexander Muss High School in Israel (AMHSI) affiliated with Alexander Muss Institute for Israel Education (AMIIE), Hod HaSharon 45102, Israel
  • Department of Sciences, Columbia High School, Maplewood, NJ, USA
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/ Aidan Leit
  • Department of Anatomy, Alexander Muss High School in Israel (AMHSI) affiliated with Alexander Muss Institute for Israel Education (AMIIE), Hod HaSharon 45102, Israel
  • Department of Sciences, The Harley School, Rochester, NY, USA
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/ Ryan Cleminson / Michael Shterenshis
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Anatomy, Alexander Muss High School in Israel (AMHSI) affiliated with Alexander Muss Institute for Israel Education (AMIIE), Aliyat HaNoar 9, Hod HaSharon 45102, Israel, Phone: +97254-337-9865
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Published Online: 2019-01-12 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2018-0066

Abstract

Aim

The reported incidence of isolated hemihyperplasia (IH) has a very wide range (from 1:13,000 to 1:86,000 live births) and further clarification is needed. We hypothesized that a survey of the birth prevalence of IH among newborn infants may underestimate the incidence of IH by overlooking late-onset cases.

Methods

The prospective international multicenter study utilized the two-steps selection tool for an anonymous survey of volunteers of 15–18 years old. The initial step was “three measurements-three questions” screening, or “face-palms-calves survey”. The subsequent step was an in-depth assessment of selected cases to exclude localized, lesional and syndrome-related cases as well as body asymmetry within normative range and to select suspected cases of IH. This step included measurements of various anatomical regions and a subsequent questionnaire. The participants that were selected in a risk group were advised to refer to medical institutions for clinical, genetic and instrumental investigation.

Results

Out of 6000 of selected participants (male, M 3452, female, F 2548), 229 (3.82%) were selected for detailed investigation and 57 (0.95%) were assigned to the risk group. Only 36 of them were actually referred to medical institutions and in two cases the diagnosis of IH was confirmed.

Conclusion

Our survey indicated the prevalence of IH at the age of adolescence as approximately 1:3000. While IH is a hereditary genetic disorder, it may not be detected in newborns and infants and the true prevalence of the disease can be estimated if older age children are screened.

Keywords: adolescents; asymmetric regional; body asymmetry; body overgrowth; hemihyperplasia; hemihypertrophy

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About the article

Received: 2018-04-02

Accepted: 2018-06-05

Published Online: 2019-01-12


Citation Information: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 20180066, ISSN (Online) 2191-0278, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2018-0066.

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