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International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Editor-in-Chief: Merrick, Joav

Editorial Board: Birch, Diana ML / Blum, Robert W. / Greydanus, MD, Dr. HC (Athens), Donald E. / Hardoff, Daniel / Kerr, Mike / Levy, Howard B / Morad, Mohammed / Omar, Hatim A. / de Paul, Joaquin / Rydelius, Per-Anders / Shek, Daniel T.L. / Sher, Leo / Silber, Tomas J. / Towns, Susan / Urkin, Jacob / Verhofstadt-Deneve, Leni / Zeltzer, Lonnie / Tenenbaum, Ariel


CiteScore 2018: 0.79

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.350
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.476

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2191-0278
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Appointed by young people – a qualitative study on young patients recruiting hospital staff in Denmark

Signe Hanghøj
  • Corresponding author
  • Center of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København Ø, Denmark
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Ena L. Thomsen
  • Center of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, 2100 København Ø, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Charlotte Blix
  • Center of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, 2100 København Ø, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Pernille Grarup Hertz
  • Center of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, 2100 København Ø, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Kirsten A. Boisen
  • Center of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, 2100 København Ø, Denmark
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2018-10-24 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2018-0073

Abstract

Background

There is a lack of knowledge about young peoples’wishes for the qualifications including skills and personal traits of hospital staff during the recruitment process.

Objective

The aim of this qualitative study was to explore which qualifications, skills and personal traits young people prefer when recruiting hospital staff.

Methods

A Youth Recruitment Committee (YRC) consisting of four young people performed six job interviews in parallel to conventional job interviews at Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Denmark. The interviews with the candidates and the subsequent YRC deliberation were observed and recorded, and data were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results

Four main themes with matching sub-themes emerged from the data: (1) Personality (appearance and commitment), (2) Professional skills (approach, mentality and activities), (3) Project management (skills and experience), (4) Communication (during the interview and experiential approach to youth). It was important to the YRC that the candidate had professional experience working with young people as well as being a skilled project manager. The YRC also assessed the candidates´ communication during the interview.

Conclusions

By inviting young people in as a separate recruitment committee, their perspectives and preferences were noted without interference from professionals. Our findings are in line with previous research regarding young peoples´ preferences on youth-friendly health services. Furthermore, this approach made it possible to evaluate candidates´ communication skills with young people as they were assessed during the job interviews.

Keywords: adolescents; communication; hospital staff; participation; qualifications; qualitative; recruitment; user involvement

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About the article

Received: 2018-04-18

Accepted: 2018-06-30

Published Online: 2018-10-24


Declarations of conflicting interests: The authors declared no potential conflicts of interests.

Funding: The Egmont Foundation funded this study.


Citation Information: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 20180073, ISSN (Online) 2191-0278, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2018-0073.

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