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International Journal of Chemical Reactor Engineering

Ed. by de Lasa, Hugo / Xu, Charles Chunbao

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Volume 16, Issue 7

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Volume 1 (2002)

NOx process inhibition and energy efficiency improvement in new swirl modification device for steel slag based on coal combustion

Junxiang Guo
  • School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
  • School of Energy and Environment Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
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/ Lingling Zhang
  • Corresponding author
  • School of Energy and Environment Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
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/ Daqiang Cang
  • School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
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/ Liying Qi
  • College of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Hebei University of Engineering, Hebei 056038, China
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/ Wenbin Dai
  • State Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Reuse for Building Materials (SKL-SWR), Beijing Building Materials Academy of Sciences Research (BBMA), Beijing 100083, China
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/ Rufei Wei
  • Corresponding author
  • State Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Reuse for Building Materials (SKL-SWR), Beijing Building Materials Academy of Sciences Research (BBMA), Beijing 100083, China
  • School of metallurgical engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan Shi, China
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Published Online: 2018-05-11 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijcre-2018-0007

Abstract

In this study, a novel swirl combustion modified device for steel slag was designed and enhanced with the objective of achieving highly efficient and clean coal combustion and also for achieving the whole elements utilization of coal. Coal ash and steel slag were melted in the combustion chamber and subsequently entered the slag chamber. The detrimental substances solidified and formed crystals, which allowed for the comprehensive utilization of the ash and slag. Our experiments mainly aimed to mitigate the formation of NOx, while using the heat and slag simultaneously during the coal combustion without a combustion efficiency penalty. The increase in the device’s energy efficiency and reduction in the NOx emissions are important requirements for industrialization.

The experiments were carried out in an optimized swirling combustion device, which had a different structure and various coal feeding conditions in comparison to previously reported devices. The fuel-staged and non-staged combustion experiments were compared under different coal ratios (bitumite:anthracite). For the fuel-staged combustion experiments, the NOx concentration in the flue gas was observed to decrease significantly when the coal ratio of 1:1, an excess air coefficient of 1.2, and a fuel-staged ratio of 15:85 were used. Under these conditions, the flue gas temperature was as high as 1,620°C, while the NOx concentration was as low as 320 mg/m3 at 6 % O2. The air-surrounding-fuel structure that formed in the furnace was very beneficial in reducing the formation of NOx. In comparison to other types of coal burners, the experimental combustion device designed in this study achieved a significant reduction of NOx emissions (approximately 80 %).

Keywords: coal swirl combustion; NO x emission; fuel-staged feeding; non-staged feeding; steel slag modification

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About the article

Received: 2018-01-13

Accepted: 2018-04-08

Revised: 2018-03-11

Published Online: 2018-05-11


Citation Information: International Journal of Chemical Reactor Engineering, Volume 16, Issue 7, 20180007, ISSN (Online) 1542-6580, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijcre-2018-0007.

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