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International Journal of Chemical Reactor Engineering

Ed. by de Lasa, Hugo / Xu, Charles Chunbao

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Potassium Hydroxide Activated Hydrogen Generation Using Aluminum in Water Splitting Reaction

Shyam P. Tekade / Diwakar Z. Shende
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Chemical Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, Nagpur 440010, India
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/ Kailas L. Wasewar
  • Department of Chemical Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, Nagpur 440010, India
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Published Online: 2018-10-19 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijcre-2018-0193

Abstract

The water splitting reaction using aluminum represents one of the best methods for on-demand hydrogen requirements. The present paper describes the hydrogen generation in water splitting reaction using aluminum in presence of potassium hydroxide as an alkaline activator. The effect of concentration of KOH, temperature, and shape of aluminum particles on the hydrogen generation in water splitting reaction was experimentally studied using various concentrations of aqueous KOH viz. 0.25 N, 0.50 N, 0.75 N and 1.0 N, at different temperatures of 30 °C, 40 °C, and 50 °C for Al powder (diameter: 200 mesh) and Al foil (thickness: 11 microns). The complete conversion of Al was recorded for all the experimental runs. The average hydrogen generation rate was found to vary between 3.40 ml/min to 21 ml/min per 0.1 g aluminum under considered concentrations and temperatures. The shrinking core model was applied to the experimental data for predicting the rate controlling mechanism.

Keywords: water splitting reaction; KOH as an activator; hydrogen generation; shrinking core model

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About the article

Received: 2018-07-27

Accepted: 2018-09-22

Revised: 2018-09-20

Published Online: 2018-10-19


Citation Information: International Journal of Chemical Reactor Engineering, 20180193, ISSN (Online) 1542-6580, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijcre-2018-0193.

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