Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

International Journal on Disability and Human Development

Official journal of the the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Israel

More options …
Volume 11, Issue 4

Issues

Disparities in psychosocial health and the built environment during pregnancy

Allison Gruber
  • Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Pamela Maxson
  • Corresponding author
  • Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2012-11-12 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijdhd-2012-0045

Abstract

Despite advancements in prenatal care and technologies, significant disparities in pregnancy outcomes remain. Non-Hispanic Black women and their infants suffer a disproportionately high burden of poor pregnancy outcomes in comparison to non-Hispanic White women. Race and socioeconomic status alone have failed to account for these persistent disparities; increasing evidence has associated environmental and social factors with poor pregnancy outcomes. This project investigates the joint contributions of environmental and psychosocial factors to the cycle of disparities in pregnancy outcomes in the Healthy Pregnancy, Healthy Baby prospective cohort study of pregnant women in Durham, North Carolina. The results indicate that women who are disadvantaged are exposed to multiple environmental and psychological stressors throughout their pregnancy, some of which are in turn related to the pregnancy outcomes of some of these women. Suggestions on breaking the cycle of disadvantage and disability are discussed.

Keywords: environment; health status disparities; infant; low birth weight; pregnancy outcome; premature birth; public health

About the article

Corresponding author: Dr. Pamela Maxson, Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, A135a-LSRC, Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708, USA.


Received: 2012-09-02

Accepted: 2012-11-05

Published Online: 2012-11-12

Published in Print: 2012-11-01


Citation Information: , Volume 11, Issue 4, Pages 377–385, ISSN (Online) 2191-0367, ISSN (Print) 2191-1231, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijdhd-2012-0045.

Export Citation

©2012 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston.Get Permission

Citing Articles

Here you can find all Crossref-listed publications in which this article is cited. If you would like to receive automatic email messages as soon as this article is cited in other publications, simply activate the “Citation Alert” on the top of this page.

[1]
Dasom Kim, Insook Lee, Kyung-Sook Bang, Sungjae Kim, and Yunjeong Yi
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2019, Volume 16, Number 11, Page 2065

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in