Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

International Journal on Disability and Human Development

Official journal of the the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Israel

More options …
Volume 11, Issue 4

Issues

The impact of third-hand smoke education in a pediatric emergency department on caregiver smoking policies and quit status: a pilot study

Sima Patel
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Phyllis Hendry
  • Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Colleen Kalynych
  • Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Ryan Butterfield
  • Center for Health Equity and Quality Research (CHEQR), University of Florida, Jacksonville College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Michelle Lott
  • Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Katryne Lukens-Bull
  • Center for Health Equity and Quality Research (CHEQR), University of Florida, Jacksonville College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2012-11-12 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijdhd-2012-0052

Abstract

Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure is an international problem. Parental smoking is the primary exposure for children. While the adverse health effects of secondhand smoke to children are well recognized and used to educate caregivers, the concept of “third-hand smoke” (THS) and its use as an educational tool has been less studied. The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of brief THS intervention on smoking behaviors of caregivers of children seen in an urban pediatric ED. A convenience sample of children <36 months with caregivers who smoke brought to a pediatric ED was recruited. Consented caregivers were randomized to a control group who received routine education or intervention group who received brief THS education. Follow-up phone assessments were completed to evaluate smoking behavior changes. Of 40 caregivers analyzed, 85% were female, 72% were non-white, and mean age was 29 years. Results revealed the treatment group was more likely to change smoking policies (OR 2.0, 95% CI 0.166–24.069), reduce the number of cigarettes (OR 4.88, 95% CI 0.785–30.286), or quit smoking (OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.346–3.590). This study demonstrated that a brief THS intervention in our sample influenced smokers to change smoking behaviors. These changes would ultimately decrease ETS exposure to children and its adverse health effects. With the limitations of small sample size and high loss to follow-up, the study does not show statistical significance for generalizability.

Keywords: brief intervention; environmental tobacco smoke exposure; Screening, Brief Intervention, and Refer to Treatment (SBIRT); smoking education; third-hand smoke

About the article

Corresponding author: Sima Patel, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Jacksonville College of Medicine, University of Florida Jacksonville, 655 West 8th Street, Jacksonville, FL 32209, USA


Received: 2011-06-01

Accepted: 2011-08-20

Published Online: 2012-11-12

Published in Print: 2012-11-01


Citation Information: , Volume 11, Issue 4, Pages 335–342, ISSN (Online) 2191-0367, ISSN (Print) 2191-1231, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijdhd-2012-0052.

Export Citation

©2012 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston.Get Permission

Citing Articles

Here you can find all Crossref-listed publications in which this article is cited. If you would like to receive automatic email messages as soon as this article is cited in other publications, simply activate the “Citation Alert” on the top of this page.

[1]
Ana Díez-Izquierdo, Pia Cassanello, Aurea Cartanyà, Núria Matilla-Santander, Albert Balaguer Santamaria, and Jose M Martinez-Sanchez
Pediatric Research, 2018
[2]
Ana Díez-Izquierdo, Pia Cassanello-Peñarroya, Cristina Lidón-Moyano, Nuria Matilla-Santander, Albert Balaguer, and Jose M. Martínez-Sánchez
Environmental Research, 2018
[3]
Behrooz Behbod, Mohit Sharma, Ruchi Baxi, Robert Roseby, and Premila Webster
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2018
[4]
Laura Rosen and Ruth Suhami
BMC Medical Research Methodology, 2016, Volume 16, Number 1

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in