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International Journal on Disability and Human Development

Official journal of the the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Israel

Editor-in-Chief: Merrick, Joav

Editorial Board Member: Brooks, Tony / Carmeli, BPT, Eliezer / Caron, MPH, Rosemary M. / Davidson, Philip W / Galil, Ahron / Heller, Tamar / Huff, Marlene B. / Janicki, Matthew P. / Kerr, Mike / Levy, Howard B / Lindström, Bengt / Morad, Mohammed / Omar, Hatim A. / Postolache, Teodor T. / Prasher, Vee / Shek, Daniel T.L. / Sher, Leo / Stratakis, Constantine A

4 Issues per year


CiteScore 2016: 0.25

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 0.179
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 0.234

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2191-0367
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Volume 13, Issue 2 (May 2014)

Issues

Objective outcome evaluation of a positive youth development program in China

Daniel T.L. Shek
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P.R. China
  • Centre for Innovative Programmes for Adolescents and Families, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P.R. China
  • Department of Social Work, East China Normal University, Shanghai, P.R. China
  • Kiang Wu Nursing College of Macau, Macau, P.R. China
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Lu Yu
  • Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P.R. China
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Rachel C.F. Sun / Tak Yan Lee / Xiao Yan Han / Xi Xi Li / Xin Zhao
Published Online: 2014-04-17 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijdhd-2014-0311

Abstract

An adapted version of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. developed in Hong Kong was implemented in four secondary schools in East China, with the financial support of the Tin Ka Ping Foundation. A quasi-experimental design with the inclusion of both experimental and control schools was adopted. Results showed that the experimental schools and control schools were basically equivalent in terms of pretest measures. For the posttest measures, analyses showed that students in the experimental schools performed better than did students in the control schools. Alternative analyses using between-subjects ANCOVAs showed similar effects. Results also revealed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the program and the instructors, with 96.3% of the respondents regarding the program as helpful to them. The present study provides preliminary support for the effectiveness of the adapted Project P.A.T.H.S. in mainland China.

Keywords: Chinese adolescents; objective outcome evaluation; positive youth development; Project P.A.T.H.S.; quasi-experimental design

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About the article

Corresponding author: Professor Daniel T.L. Shek, PhD, FHKPS, BBS, SBS, JP, Associate Vice President (Undergraduate Programme), and Chair Professor of Applied Social Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Room HJ407, Core H, Hunghom, Hong Kong, E-mail:


Received: 2013-01-02

Accepted: 2013-02-09

Published Online: 2014-04-17

Published in Print: 2014-05-01


Citation Information: International Journal on Disability and Human Development, ISSN (Online) 2191-0367, ISSN (Print) 2191-1231, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijdhd-2014-0311.

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