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International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health

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Acute mountain sickness, two cases and their treatment in the field

Heikki Karinen
  • Unit for Occupational Health, Institute of Health Science, University of Tampere, Medisiinarinkatu 3, 33521, Tampere, Finland
  • Unit for Occupational Health, Institute of Health Science, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
  • Department of Sports and Exercise Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
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/ Heikki Tikkanen
  • Department of Sports and Exercise Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
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Published Online: 2012-07-13 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/s13382-012-0037-3
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  • [2] Honigman B, Theis MK, Koziol-McLain J, Roach R, Yip R, Houston C, et al. Acute mountain sickness in a general tourist population at moderate altitudes. Ann Intern Med 1993;118:587–592. Google Scholar

  • [3] Karinen HM, Peltonen JE, Tikkanen HO. Prevalence of acute mountain sickness among Finnish trekkers on Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: an observational study. High Alt Med Biol 2008;4:301–306. CrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • [4] Hackett PH, Oelz O. The Lake Louise consensus on the definition and qualification of altitude illness. In: Sutton J, Goates G, Houston C, editors. Hypoxia mountain medicine. Burlington, VT: Queen City Printers; 1992. p. 327–330. Google Scholar

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  • [12] Luks AM, McIntosh SE, Grissom CK, Auerbach PS, Rodway GW, Schoene RB, et al. Wilderness Medical Society Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness. Wilderness Environ Med 2010;21: 146–155. Web of ScienceGoogle Scholar

About the article

Published Online: 2012-07-13

Published in Print: 2012-06-01


Citation Information: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, Volume 25, Issue 3, Pages 304–309, ISSN (Online) 1896-494X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/s13382-012-0037-3.

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© 2012 Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine Łódź, Poland.

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