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International Journal of the Sociology of Language

Founded by Fishman, Joshua A.

Ed. by Duchêne, Alexandre / Coulmas, Florian


CiteScore 2018: 1.10

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.062
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.933

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1613-3668
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Volume 2017, Issue 248

Issues

What is in a language: Essentialism in macro-sociolinguistic research on Afrikaans

Johanita Kirsten
Published Online: 2017-08-17 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijsl-2017-0035

Abstract

Essentialist conceptions about language, and the relationship between language and other things, are still fairly common in society, and to some extent in linguistics. It is of particular relevance when working with specific (named or unnamed) languages in multilingual environments, or with one specific (named or unnamed) variety of a language among many. This article investigates how essentialism manifests in a collection of macro-sociolinguistic research articles on Afrikaans in contemporary, multilingual South Africa through critical discourse analysis. The findings indicate that subtle and covert indications of an extent of essentialism are quite common in the data, and even explicitly essentialist statements and claims are not completely absent. Some counter-examples of and challenges to essentialism in the data are also explored, although they are found to be less common than covert instances of essentialism. Suggestions regarding a few essentialism-related problems that arise from the data are discussed briefly.

Keywords: essentialism; reification; multilingualism; language shift; macro-sociolinguistics

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About the article

Published Online: 2017-08-17

Published in Print: 2017-09-26


Citation Information: International Journal of the Sociology of Language, Volume 2017, Issue 248, Pages 159–195, ISSN (Online) 1613-3668, ISSN (Print) 0165-2516, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijsl-2017-0035.

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