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Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization

Ed. by Azzam, Azzeddine

2 Issues per year


CiteScore 2016: 0.70

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1542-0485
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I Can’t Wait: Methods for Measuring and Moderating Individual Differences in Impulsive Choice

Jennifer R. Peterson
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Psychological Sciences, Kansas State University, 492 Bluemont Hall, 1100 Mid-campus Drive, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
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/ Catherine C. Hill
  • Department of Psychological Sciences, Kansas State University, 492 Bluemont Hall, 1100 Mid-campus Drive, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
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/ Andrew T. Marshall
  • Department of Psychological Sciences, Kansas State University, 492 Bluemont Hall, 1100 Mid-campus Drive, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
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/ Sarah L. Stuebing
  • Department of Psychological Sciences, Kansas State University, 492 Bluemont Hall, 1100 Mid-campus Drive, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
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/ Kimberly Kirkpatrick
  • Department of Psychological Sciences, Kansas State University, 492 Bluemont Hall, 1100 Mid-campus Drive, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
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Published Online: 2015-11-19 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jafio-2015-0024

Abstract

Impulsive choice behavior occurs when individuals make choices without regard for future consequences. This behavior is often maladaptive and is a common symptom in many disorders, including drug abuse, compulsive gambling, and obesity. Several proposed mechanisms may influence impulsive choice behavior. These mechanisms provide a variety of pathways that may provide the basis for individual differences that are often evident when measuring choice behavior. This review provides an overview of these different pathways to impulsive choice, and the behavioral intervention strategies being developed to moderate impulsive choice. Because of the compelling link between impulsive choice behavior and the near-epidemic pervasiveness of obesity in the United States, we focus on the relationship between impulsive choice behavior and obesity as a test case for application of the multiple pathways approach. Choosing immediate gratification over healthier long term food choices is a contributing factor to the obesity crisis. Behavioral interventions can lead to more self-controlled choices in a rat pre-clinical model, suggesting a possible gateway for translation to human populations. Designing and implementing effective impulsive choice interventions is crucial to improving the overall health and well-being of impulsive individuals.

Keywords: impulsive choice; individual differences; intervention; rat

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About the article

Published Online: 2015-11-19

Published in Print: 2015-01-01


Funding: National Institute of Mental Health (Grant/Award Number: ‘MH-085739’).


Citation Information: Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, ISSN (Online) 1542-0485, ISSN (Print) 2194-5896, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jafio-2015-0024.

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