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Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology

Editor-in-Chief: Horowitz, Michal

Editorial Board: Das, Kusal K. / Epstein, Yoram / S. Gershon MD, Elliot / Kodesh , Einat / Kohen, Ron / Lichtstein, David / Maloyan, Alina / Mechoulam, Raphael / Roth, Joachim / Schneider, Suzanne / Shohami, Esther / Sohmer, Haim / Yoshikawa, Toshikazu / Tam, Joseph


CiteScore 2016: 1.01

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 0.349
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 0.495

Online
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2191-0286
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Volume 23, Issue 4

Issues

Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity, antioxidant properties and phenolic composition of two Aframomum species

Stephen A. Adefegha
  • Functional Food and Nutraceutical Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Ganiyu Oboh
  • Corresponding author
  • Functional Food and Nutraceutical Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2012-09-26 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jbcpp-2012-0029

Abstract

Background: Aframomum species are widely used as a food supplement and remedy in folklore medicine for the management of several diseases. This study was designed to investigate the acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity and antioxidant properties of phenolic-rich extracts from two Aframomum species: Aframomum danielli (Hook F.) K. Schum (Zingiberaceae) and Aframomum melegueta (Roscoe) K. Schum (Zingiberaceae) seeds.

Methods: Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity and antioxidant properties [inhibition of quinolinic acid (QA)-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain, reducing properties, 2,2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging abilities] using in vitro models were evaluated. Phenolic composition of the seed extracts using reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC) and gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) were also assessed.

Results: Both extracts exhibited acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity in a dose-dependent manner (125–1000 μg/mL); however, A. melegueta extract (IC50=373.33 μg/mL) had a significantly higher (p<0.05) acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity than A. danielli extract (IC50=417.10 μg/mL). Furthermore, both extracts significantly decreased QA-elevated brain malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, reduced Fe3+ to Fe2+ and scavenged DPPH and ABTS radicals. Phenolic characterization of the seeds by RP-HPLC at 280 nm showed abundance of quercetin and kaempferol in A. melegueta and chlorogenic acid in A. danielli, whereas GC-FID revealed that p-hydroxybenzoic acid was abundant in both seeds.

Conclusions: Inhibitory effect of these extracts on acetylcholinesterase activity and their antioxidant property could be attributed to the combined effect of phenolic and non-phenolic constituents of the seeds. These effects could be part of the possible biochemical mechanism by which these seeds elicit their protection against oxidative stress in brain; however, A. melegueta showed the more promising potential.

Keywords: acetylcholinesterase; Aframomum danielli; Aframomum melegueta; brain; lipid peroxidation; phenolics

About the article

Corresponding author: Ganiyu Oboh, Functional Food and Nutraceutical Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Technology, Akure, P.M.B. 704, Akure 340001, Nigeria Phone: +234-70-31388644, Fax: +234-70-98721306


Received: 2012-07-11

Accepted: 2012-08-20

Published Online: 2012-09-26

Published in Print: 2012-11-01


Citation Information: Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology, Volume 23, Issue 4, Pages 153–161, ISSN (Online) 2191-0286, ISSN (Print) 0792-6855, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jbcpp-2012-0029.

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