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Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine

Editor-in-Chief: Lui, Edmund

Ed. by Ko, Robert / Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin / Saunders, Paul / Suntres, PH. D., Zacharias


CiteScore 2017: 1.41

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 0.472
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 0.564

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1553-3840
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Bioactive potential of Indian stinging plants leaf extract against pathogenic fungi

Sanjay Mohan Gupta
  • Corresponding author
  • Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research (DIBER), DRDO, Goraparao, PO-Arjunpur, Haldwani 263 139, India
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  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Kamal Kumar
  • Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research (DIBER), DRDO, Goraparao, PO-Arjunpur, Haldwani 263 139, India
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Sanjai Kumar Dwivedi
  • Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research (DIBER), DRDO, Goraparao, PO-Arjunpur, Haldwani 263 139, India
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/ Madhu Bala
  • Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research (DIBER), DRDO, Goraparao, PO-Arjunpur, Haldwani 263 139, India
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  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2018-06-21 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2017-0125

Abstract

Background & methods

We investigated the in vitro antioxidant and antifungal activity by agar disc diffusion assay of leaf extract of some stinging plants namely, Urtica dioica L., Tragia involucrate L., Carduus nutans L. and Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC., against pathogenic fungi causing infections/diseases.

Results

M. pruriens (Disc 4), T. involucrate (Disc 2), U. dioica (Disc 1) showed significant antifungal activity against all tested pathogens, while C. nutans (Disc 3) showed intermediate activity against only Chaetomium globosum (Cg). The leaf extract of M. Pruriens showed maximum total phenol content (~1004 µg g−1 dry wt) followed by T. involucrate, C. nutans and U. dioica. However, the ascorbate was observed highest in T. involucrate (~10.3 µg g−1 dry wt) followed by M. pruriens (~9.2 µg g−1 dry wt) but the difference was not significant (p ≤ 0.05). Likewise, M. pruriens showed maximum anthocyanin content (~0.3 µg g−1 dry wt). The activity of antioxidant enzymes revealed that M. Pruriens showed maximum ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity, while the highest guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) activities were observed in C. nutans and U. dioica, respectively.

Conclusions

M. Pruriens showed potential in vitro antioxidant and antifungal activity against studied pathogens that may be used for ethno-pharmacological uses.

This article offers supplementary material which is provided at the end of the article.

Keywords: agar disc diffusion assay; antifungal and antioxidant activity; pathogen; stinging plants

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About the article

Received: 2017-08-28

Accepted: 2018-05-11

Published Online: 2018-06-21


Author contributions: All the authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission.

Research funding: Financial assistance received by KK from Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO), India is duly acknowledged.

Employment or leadership: None declared.

Honorarium: None declared.

Competing interests: All authors read and approved the final manuscript and declared that no competing interests exist. The funding organization(s) played no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the report for publication.


Citation Information: Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Volume 16, Issue 1, 20170125, ISSN (Online) 1553-3840, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2017-0125.

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