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Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine

Editor-in-Chief: Lui, Edmund

Ed. by Ko, Robert / Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin / Saunders, Paul / Suntres, PH. D., Zacharias


CiteScore 2017: 1.41

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 0.472
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 0.564

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1553-3840
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Neuroprotective Effects of the Anthocleista Schweinfurthii Gilg. (Loganiaceae) Stem Bark Extract in Postmenopause-Like Model of Ovariectomized Wistar Rats

Ngoungoure Madeleine Chantal
  • Animal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science,University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
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/ Dzeufiet Djomeni Paul Désiré
  • Corresponding author
  • Animal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science,University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
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/ Bilanda Danielle Caude
  • Animal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science,University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
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/ Mengue Ngandena Yolande Sandrine
  • Animal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science,University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
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/ Mbolang Nguegang Lohik
  • Animal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science,University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
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/ Mballa Marguerite Francine
  • Animal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science,University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
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/ Dzekui Tchuo Larissa
  • Animal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science,University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
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/ Kameni Poumeni Mireille
  • Animal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science,University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
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/ Kamtchouing Pierre
  • Animal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Science,University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
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Published Online: 2019-01-19 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2017-0137

Abstract

Background

Estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal period causes severe neuroendocrine changes in brain which influences memory and other nervous functions. Anthocleista schweinfurthii is used traditionally to treat female infertility and menopause related symptoms. This study was performed to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of aqueous extract of Anthocleista schweinfurthii on brain in a postmenopause-like model of ovariectomized Wistar rats.

Methods

Thirty animals were sham-operated or ovariectomized (Ovx) 84 days after surgery, six groups of five rats each were daily treated orally during 28 days with: distilled water for groups 1 (sham-operated) and 2 (Ovx), estradiol valerate (group 3) and the three doses of extracts {groups 4, 5 and 6 (Ovx)}. Biochemical and histological evaluations focused on brain.

Results

Compared to sham-operated control, ovariectomy decreased total protein levels in brain (p<0.01) which was increased by plant extract at the dose of 300 mg/kg (p<0.05), underlying its anabolic properties. Ovariectomy significantly decreased magnesium levels in brain (p<0.001). Anthocleista schweinfurthii increased significantly magnesium levels (p<0.01), showing its capacity to act on synaptic conduction. Ovariectomy induced oxidative stress by increasing malondialdehyde levels (p<0.05) and decreasing reduced glutathione levels (p<0.05) in brain. The plant extract exhibited antioxidative activity by reducing malondialdehyde levels and increasing glutathione levels in brain. Damage in brain structure which was caused by ovariectomy disappeared following the treatment.

Conclusions

Results suggest that Anthocleista schweinfurthii may have neuroprotective effects in Ovx Wistar rats by increasing total protein, magnesium levels and reducing oxidative stress in brain.

Keywords: Anthocleista schweinfurthii; brain; oxidative stress; postmenopausal symptom

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About the article

Received: 2017-10-19

Accepted: 2018-05-23

Published Online: 2019-01-19


Author contributions: All the authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission.

Research funding: None declared.

Employment or leadership: None declared.

Honorarium: None declared.

Competing interests: The funding organization(s) played no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the report for publication.


Citation Information: Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Volume 16, Issue 1, 20170137, ISSN (Online) 1553-3840, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2017-0137.

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