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Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management

Editor-in-Chief: Renda-Tanali, Irmak, D.Sc.

Managing Editor: McGee, Sibel, Ph.D.

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1547-7355
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Planning and Executing Scenario Based Simulation Exercises: Methodological Lessons

Dewald Van Niekerk
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ Christo Coetzee
  • Corresponding author
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
  • Email
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/ Doret Botha
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ Michael John Murphree
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ Kristel Fourie
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ Tanya Le Roux
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ Gideon Wentink
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ Leandri Kruger
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ Lesego Shoroma
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ Kylah Genade
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ Suna Meyer
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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/ E. Annandale
  • African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, North West Province, South Africa
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Published Online: 2014-12-02 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jhsem-2013-0077

Abstract

The South African disaster management legislation advocates the importance of implementing pro-active disaster risk reduction strategies that will ensure a safe and sustainable society. One key strategic activity identified is the use of simulation exercises to improve overall societal readiness and inter-agency coordination in case of major incidents or disasters. However, very little is currently understood or planned especially at South African local government level, on what simulation exercises entail and the methodology behind their implementation. This paper aims at conveying some crucial methodological inputs that disaster risk managers or emergency response agencies should consider when planning, designing and implementing simulation exercises by analysing a hazardous chemical spillage simulation in the Tlokwe Local Municipality, North-West Province, South Africa. The research found that in the South African context attention needs to be paid to methodological issues such as scenario development, role-player selection, fidelity during simulation delivery, data collection and participant (de)briefing.

Keywords: contingency planning; emergency response; methodology; risk reduction; simulation

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About the article

Corresponding author: Christo Coetzee, African Centre for Disaster Studies, North West University Potchefstroom Campus, 11 Hoffman Street Potchefstroom, Potchefstroom, North West Province 2520, South Africa, e-mail:


Published Online: 2014-12-02

Published in Print: 2015-04-01


Citation Information: Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, ISSN (Online) 1547-7355, ISSN (Print) 2194-6361, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jhsem-2013-0077.

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