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Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism

Editor-in-Chief: Kiess, Wieland

Ed. by Bereket, Abdullah / Darendeliler, Feyza / Dattani, Mehul / Gustafsson, Jan / Luo, Fei Hong / Mericq, Veronica / Toppari, Jorma


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 1.239

CiteScore 2018: 1.22

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2191-0251
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Volume 27, Issue 7-8

Issues

Influence of hormonal parameters, bone mineral density and bone turnover on fracture risk in healthy male adolescents: a case control study

Maria A. Papaefthymiou
  • Corresponding author
  • Center for Adolescent Medicine and UNESCO Chair in Adolescent Medicine and Health Care, First Department of Pediatrics, University of Athens Medical School, Children’s Hospital ‘Aghia Sophia’, Athens, Greece
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Chryssa Bakoula
  • Center for Adolescent Medicine and UNESCO Chair in Adolescent Medicine and Health Care, First Department of Pediatrics, University of Athens Medical School, Children’s Hospital ‘Aghia Sophia’, Athens, Greece
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Aikaterini Sarra
  • Center for Adolescent Medicine and UNESCO Chair in Adolescent Medicine and Health Care, First Department of Pediatrics, University of Athens Medical School, Children’s Hospital ‘Aghia Sophia’, Athens, Greece
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Ioannis Papassotiriou / George P. Chrousos
  • Center for Adolescent Medicine and UNESCO Chair in Adolescent Medicine and Health Care, First Department of Pediatrics, University of Athens Medical School, Children’s Hospital ‘Aghia Sophia’, Athens, Greece
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Flora Bacopoulou
  • Center for Adolescent Medicine and UNESCO Chair in Adolescent Medicine and Health Care, First Department of Pediatrics, University of Athens Medical School, Children’s Hospital ‘Aghia Sophia’, Athens, Greece
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2014-04-16 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2013-0407

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess possible associations between potential risk factors for fractures and their occurrence in otherwise healthy Greek male adolescents.

Subjects: A total of 63 male adolescents participated in the study, 21 males with a history of at least one fracture and 42 healthy male controls.

Methods: Each participant was assessed for physical and pubertal status, hormonal profile, bone mineral density, bone turnover indices, and dietary habits.

Results: The lower bone mineral density-z scores and increasing testosterone and serum collagen type 1 cross-linked C-telopeptide levels were related to fracture risk, whereas increased insulin-like growth factor-1, soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (factor-κB) ligand, and soluble receptor activator of nuclear factors-κB ligand/osteoprotegerin levels were protective for fractures.

Conclusions: The findings indicate a potential ‘added value’ of hormonal parameters and bone markers to bone mineral density for evaluating fracture risk in healthy male adolescents.

Keywords: bone mineral density; bone turnover markers; fracture; male adolescents; testosterone

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About the article

Corresponding author: Maria A. Papaefthymiou, MD, Center for Adolescent Medicine and UNESCO Chair in Adolescent Medicine and Health Care, First Department of Pediatrics, University of Athens Medical School, Children’s Hospital ‘Aghia Sophia’, Athens, Greece and 4 Dilou Street, Athens 11527, Greece, Phone: +306938900148, 00302167002902, Fax: +302167002902, E-mail:


Received: 2013-10-19

Accepted: 2014-02-28

Published Online: 2014-04-16

Published in Print: 2014-07-01


Citation Information: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 27, Issue 7-8, Pages 685–692, ISSN (Online) 2191-0251, ISSN (Print) 0334-018X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2013-0407.

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