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Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism

Editor-in-Chief: Kiess, Wieland

Ed. by Bereket, Abdullah / Darendeliler, Feyza / Dattani, Mehul / Gustafsson, Jan / Luo, Fei Hong / Toppari, Jorma / Turan, Serap Demircioglu


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 1.239

CiteScore 2018: 1.22

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.507
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2191-0251
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Volume 27, Issue 9-10

Issues

Maternal factors and complications of preterm birth associated with neonatal thyroid stimulating hormone

Kelli K. Ryckman / Cassandra N. Spracklen / John M. Dagle / Jeffrey C. Murray
Published Online: 2014-05-22 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2013-0366

Abstract

Thyroid hormones are important regulators of fetal neurodevelopment. Among preterm infants, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is highly variable. Understanding this variability will further improvements in screening for thyroid disorders in preterm infants. We examined 61 maternal and infant clinical and demographic factors for associations with neonatal TSH levels in 698 preterm neonates. TSH was measured as part of routine State-mandated newborn screening in Iowa. Of the maternal characteristics, nulliparous women (p=8×10–4), women with preeclampsia (p=2×10–3), and those with induced labor (p=3×10–3) had infants with higher TSH levels. TSH levels at the time of newborn screening were associated with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (p<0.0001) and sepsis (p=3×10–3). We replicated findings between parity and preeclampsia previously observed in primarily term infants. We also observed strong relationships between neonatal TSH and complications of prematurity including RDS and sepsis, which have implications for future studies examining this relationship both prenatally and longitudinally after birth.

Keywords: pregnancy complications; preterm birth; respiratory distress and sepsis; thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)

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About the article

Corresponding author: Kelli K. Ryckman, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, 105 River St, S414 CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA, Phone: +319-384-1546, E-mail:


Received: 2013-09-10

Accepted: 2014-04-22

Published Online: 2014-05-22

Published in Print: 2014-09-20


Citation Information: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 27, Issue 9-10, Pages 929–938, ISSN (Online) 2191-0251, ISSN (Print) 0334-018X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2013-0366.

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