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Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism

Editor-in-Chief: Kiess, Wieland

Ed. by Bereket, Abdullah / Darendeliler, Feyza / Dattani, Mehul / Gustafsson, Jan / Luo, Fei Hong / Mericq, Veronica / Toppari, Jorma


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2191-0251
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Volume 30, Issue 1

Issues

Elevated endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products (esRAGE) levels are associated with circulating soluble RAGE levels in diabetic children

Reiko Saito
  • Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Shunsuke Araki
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Japan
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Yukiyo Yamamoto
  • Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Japan
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/ Koichi Kusuhara
  • Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
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Published Online: 2016-12-10 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2016-0262

Abstract

Background:

Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the receptor for AGE (RAGE) play an important role in the development of diabetic vascular complications. This study aimed at investigating the relationship between the soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE), endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE), and pentosidine in childhood diabetes.

Methods:

The study included 18 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), 10 with type 2 DM (T2DM), and 22 age-matched, non-diabetic children (control).

Results:

Serum sRAGE levels in the T1DM (2557.7 pg/mL) were significantly higher than both T2DM (1956.4 pg/mL) and control (1658.5 pg/mL). The circulating levels of esRAGE in T1DM and T2DM children were similar, but significantly higher than those of control. Serum pentosidine levels in the T1DM group were positively correlated with serum sRAGE and esRAGE levels, but not with anthropometric or biochemical measurements. The duration of diabetes and esRAGE levels were independent predictors of the circulating sRAGE levels.

Conclusions:

Unlike adults, children with diabetes exhibit high circulating esRAGE levels, and both sRAGE and esRAGE levels are correlated with pentosidine levels. These results suggest that circulating sRAGE and esRAGE in children may be surrogate markers for progressive glucose toxicity in pediatric patients with childhood-onset diabetes.

Keywords: advanced glycation end products (AGEs); diabetes; oxidative stress; pentosidine

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About the article

Corresponding author: Shunsuke Araki, MD, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, 807-8555 Japan, Phone: +81 (93) 691-7254, Fax: +81 (93) 691-9338


Received: 2016-07-01

Accepted: 2016-11-03

Published Online: 2016-12-10

Published in Print: 2017-01-01


Author contributions: All the authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission.

Research funding: This work was supported by the Health Science Research Grant for Research on Applying Health Technology [Jitsuyoka (Nanbyo)-Ippan-014] from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW), Japan (to Shunsuke Araki) and by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research #21591340 (to Yukiyo Yamamoto) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan.

Employment or leadership: None declared.

Honorarium: None declared.

Competing interests: The funding organization(s) played no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the report for publication.


Citation Information: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 30, Issue 1, Pages 63–69, ISSN (Online) 2191-0251, ISSN (Print) 0334-018X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2016-0262.

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