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Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism

Editor-in-Chief: Kiess, Wieland

Ed. by Bereket, Abdullah / Darendeliler, Feyza / Dattani, Mehul / Gustafsson, Jan / Luo, Fei Hong / Mericq, Veronica / Toppari, Jorma


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 1.239

CiteScore 2018: 1.22

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.507
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.562

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2191-0251
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Volume 29, Issue 2

Issues

Effect of auditory guided imagery on glucose levels and on glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

Renana Gelernter
  • Corresponding author
  • Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Service, Assaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Tzrifin 70300, Israel
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Gila Lavi
  • Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Service, Assaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Tzrifin 70300, Israel
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Livia Yanai
  • Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Service, Assaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Tzrifin 70300, Israel
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Ronit Brooks
  • Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Service, Assaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Tzrifin 70300, Israel
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Yakira Bar
  • Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Service, Assaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Tzrifin 70300, Israel
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Zvi Bistrizer
  • Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Service, Assaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Tzrifin 70300, Israel
  • Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Marianna Rachmiel
  • Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Service, Assaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Tzrifin 70300, Israel
  • Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2015-08-14 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2015-0150

Abstract

Background: To assess the effect of auditory guided imagery (AGI) on glucose levels, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and quality of life (QOL) in type 1 diabetes mellitus children.

Methods: A blinded randomized controlled study comparing the effect of AGI accompanied by background music and background music solely (BMS). The study included 13 children, (7–16 years). The participants were connected to continuous glucose monitoring system for 5 days (short phase), and the outcome measure was the change in mean interstitial glucose concentration (IGC). Participants listened to the recording twice a week for 12 weeks (long phase), and the outcome measures were changes in QOL and in HbA1c.

Results: Mean IGC decreased in both AGI and BMS groups while listening. HbA1c decreased in both groups, but the decrease in the AGI group was significant.

Conclusion: Listening to AGI is a potential approach for improving glycemic control and glucose levels in youth with T1DM, but further research is required.

Keywords: glycemic control; guided imagery (GI); psychosocial; quality of life (QOL); type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM)

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About the article

Corresponding author: Renana Gelernter, MD, Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Service, Assaf HaRofeh Medical Center, Tzrifin 70300, Israel, Phone: +972-8-954-2008, Fax: +972-8-977-9156, E-mail:


Received: 2015-04-08

Accepted: 2015-07-06

Published Online: 2015-08-14

Published in Print: 2016-02-01


Citation Information: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 29, Issue 2, Pages 139–144, ISSN (Online) 2191-0251, ISSN (Print) 0334-018X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2015-0150.

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