Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

Journal of Perinatal Medicine

Official Journal of the World Association of Perinatal Medicine

Editor-in-Chief: Dudenhausen, MD, FRCOG, Joachim W.

Editorial Board Member: / Bancalari, Eduardo / Greenough, Anne / Genc, Mehmet R. / Chervenak, Frank A. / Chappelle, Joseph / Bergmann, Renate L. / Bernardes, J.F. / Bevilacqua, G. / Blickstein, Isaac / Cabero Roura, Luis / Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier / Carrera, Jose M. / D`Addario, Vincenzo / D'Alton, MD, Mary E. / Dimitrou, G. / Grunebaum, Amos / Hentschel, Roland / Köpcke, W. / Kawabata, Ichiro / Keirse, Marc J.N.C. / Kurjak M.D., Asim / Lee, Ben H. / Levene, Malcolm / Lockwood, Charles J. / Marsal, Karel / Makatsariya, Alexander / Nishida, Hiroshi / Papp, Zoltán / Pejaver, Ranjan Kumar / Pooh, Ritsuko K. / Reiss, Irwin / Romero, Roberto / Saugstad, Ola D. / Schenker, Joseph G. / Sen, Cihat / Seri, Istvan / Vetter, Klaus / Winn, Hung N. / Young, Bruce K. / Zimmermann, Roland

9 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2016: 1.577
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 1.705

CiteScore 2016: 1.49

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 0.602
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 0.832

Online
ISSN
1619-3997
See all formats and pricing
More options …
Volume 31, Issue 5 (Oct 2003)

Issues

Iron supplementation in pregnancy

E. Müngen
Published Online: 2005-06-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/JPM.2003.065

Abstract

Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder in the world. Pregnant women are at especially high risk for iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia. A considerable proportion of pregnant women in both developing and industrialized countries become anemic during pregnancy. The prevalence of anemia in pregnant women has remained unacceptably high worldwide despite the fact that routine iron supplementation during pregnancy has been almost universally recommended to prevent maternal anemia, especially in developing countries over the past 30 years. The major problem with iron supplementation during pregnancy is compliance. Despite many studies, the relationship between maternal anemia and adverse pregnancy outcome is unclear. However, there is now sufficient evidence that iron supplements increase hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels during pregnancy and also improve the maternal iron status in the puerperium, even in women who enter pregnancy with adequate iron stores. Recent information also suggests an association between maternal iron status in pregnancy and the iron status of infants postpartum. The necessity of routine iron supplementation during pregnancy has been debated in industrialized countries and routine supplementation is not universally practiced in all these countries. In view of existing data, however, routine iron supplementation during pregnancy seems to be a safe strategy to prevent maternal anemia in developing countries, where traditional diets provide inadequate iron and where malaria and other infections causing increased losses are endemic.

About the article

Published Online: 2005-06-01

Published in Print: 2003-10-01


Citation Information: Journal of Perinatal Medicine, ISSN (Print) 0300-5577, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/JPM.2003.065.

Export Citation

Citing Articles

Here you can find all Crossref-listed publications in which this article is cited. If you would like to receive automatic email messages as soon as this article is cited in other publications, simply activate the “Citation Alert” on the top of this page.

[1]
Naila Baig-Ansari, Salma Halai Badruddin, Rozina Karmaliani, Hillary Harris, Imtiaz Jehan, Omrana Pasha, Nancy Moss, Elizabeth M. McClure, and Robert L. Goldenberg
Food and Nutrition Bulletin, 2008, Volume 29, Number 2, Page 132
[2]
Rekha Athiyarath, Kalaiselvi Shaktivel, Vinod Abraham, Daisy Singh, Joseph Dian Bondu, Aaron Chapla, Biju George, Alok Srivastava, and Eunice Sindhuvi Edison
Genes & Nutrition, 2015, Volume 10, Number 4
[3]
P Petraro, C Duggan, W Urassa, G Msamanga, A Makubi, D Spiegelman, and W W Fawzi
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2013, Volume 67, Number 7, Page 708
[4]
Bright I. Nwaru, Saara Parkkali, Fatima Abacassamo, Graca Salomé, Baltazar Chilundo, Orvalho Augusto, Julie Cliff, Martinho Dgedge, Elena Regushevskaya, Minna Nikula, and Elina Hemminki
Maternal & Child Nutrition, 2015, Volume 11, Number 2, Page 146
[5]
Wafaie W. Fawzi, Gernard I. Msamanga, Willy Urassa, Ellen Hertzmark, Paul Petraro, Walter C. Willett, and Donna Spiegelman
New England Journal of Medicine, 2007, Volume 356, Number 14, Page 1423
[6]
Nuria Aranda, Blanca Ribot, Elena Garcia, Fernando E. Viteri, and Victoria Arija
Early Human Development, 2011, Volume 87, Number 12, Page 791
[7]
Julia L Finkelstein, Saurabh Mehta, Christopher P Duggan, Donna Spiegelman, Said Aboud, Roland Kupka, Gernard I Msamanga, and Wafaie W Fawzi
Public Health Nutrition, 2012, Volume 15, Number 05, Page 928
[8]
F. Habib, E. Habib Zein Alabdin, M. Alenazy, and R. Nooh
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 2009, Volume 29, Number 6, Page 487
[9]
Christian Breymann, Xu-ming Bian, Lourdes R. Blanco-Capito, Christopher Chong, Ghazala Mahmud, and Rakhshanda Rehman
Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 2011, Volume 39, Number 2
[10]
Niva Shapira
Women's Health, 2008, Volume 4, Number 6, Page 639
[11]
Wafaie Fawzi and Gernard Msamanga
Nutrition Reviews, 2004, Volume 62, Number 7, Page 269

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in