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Journal of Perinatal Medicine

Official Journal of the World Association of Perinatal Medicine

Editor-in-Chief: Dudenhausen, MD, FRCOG, Joachim W.

Ed. by Bancalari, Eduardo / Chappelle, Joseph / Chervenak, Frank A. / D'Addario , Vincenzo / Genc, Mehmet R. / Greenough, Anne / Grunebaum, Amos / Kurjak M.D., Asim / Romero, Roberto / Zalud, MD PhD, Ivica


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 1.361
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 1.578

CiteScore 2018: 1.29

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1619-3997
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Volume 32, Issue 6

Issues

Predicting neonatal outcomes: birthweight, body mass index or ponderal index?

Hala Tamim
  • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
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/ Hind Beydoun
  • Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
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/ Mohammad Itani
  • Department of Pediatrics, Najjar Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon & the Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon
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/ Mustafa Khogali
  • Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
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/ Imad Chokr / Khalid A. Yunis
  • Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
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Published Online: 2005-06-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/JPM.2004.120

Abstract

Aims: To compare birthweight (BW), body mass index (BMI) and ponderal index (PI) as predictors of selected short-term (ST) outcomes, namely Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admission and prolonged hospitalization (PH), among newborn (NB) infants.

Methods: Data was collected prospectively on 9,226 infants born during one year at nine tertiary care hospitals in Greater Beirut, Lebanon. The predictive abilities of BW, BMI and PI were compared using the area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and sensitivity analysis was performed at the optimal cut-off points for the best anthropometric measurement.

Results: The area under the ROC curve suggested superior discriminative power for BW as compared to BMI or PI, as a predictor of NICU admission (ROC area = 0.73) and PH (ROC area = 0.74). The optimal BW cut-off point was 2750 g (sensitivity: 0.49; specificity: 0.89) and 2950 g (sensitivity: 0.62; specificity: 0.78) for NICU admission and PH, respectively.

Conclusion: In our population of NB infants, BW – a crude measure of fetal growth – is a better predictor than either BMI – a measure of adiposity in adults and children – or PI – a measure of thinness at birth – for selected ST outcomes in NB infants.

Keywords: birthweight; body mass index; ponderal index

About the article

Corresponding author: Khalid A. Yunis, MD, Department of Pediatrics, American University of Beirut, Faculty of Medicine, New York office: 850 3rd Av., 18th Floor New York, NY 10022. Tel.:+961-1-350000, Ext. 5500, Fax.:+961-1-744464, E-mail:


Received: June 17, 2003

Revised: May 24, 2004

Accepted: June 1, 2004

Published Online: 2005-06-01

Published in Print: 2004-11-04


Citation Information: Journal of Perinatal Medicine, Volume 32, Issue 6, Pages 509–513, ISSN (Print) 0300-5577, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/JPM.2004.120.

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