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Journal of Perinatal Medicine

Official Journal of the World Association of Perinatal Medicine

Editor-in-Chief: Dudenhausen, MD, FRCOG, Joachim W.

Ed. by Bancalari, Eduardo / Chappelle, Joseph / Chervenak, Frank A. / D'Addario , Vincenzo / Genc, Mehmet R. / Greenough, Anne / Grunebaum, Amos / Konje, Justin C. / Kurjak M.D., Asim / Romero, Roberto / Zalud, MD PhD, Ivica


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 1.361
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 1.578

CiteScore 2018: 1.29

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.522
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.602

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1619-3997
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Volume 46, Issue 1

Issues

Cancer during pregnancy – clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes and prognosis for mothers and infants

Katarina Jeremic
  • Corresponding author
  • Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Dr Koste Todorovica 26, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 8, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Aleksandar Stefanovic
  • Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Dr Koste Todorovica 26, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 8, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Jelena Dotlic
  • Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Dr Koste Todorovica 26, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 8, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Sasa Kadija
  • Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Dr Koste Todorovica 26, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 8, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Olivera Kontic
  • Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Dr Koste Todorovica 26, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 8, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Miroslava Gojnic
  • Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Dr Koste Todorovica 26, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 8, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Jelena Jeremic
  • Clinic for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Zvecanska 9, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Vesna Kesic
  • Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Dr Koste Todorovica 26, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 8, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2017-02-21 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2016-0212

Abstract

Objective:

To assess which obstetrical characteristics and treatment improved outcomes and prognosis of pregnant women with malignancy.

Methods:

A prospective study, undertaken between 2005 and 2014, involving 35 pregnant women who were diagnosed with malignant tumors during pregnancy. Patients were followed-up for 1 year after delivery. The pregnancy course and outcome and parameters that could influence the condition of mother and fetus were evaluated.

Results:

Most malignancies were hematological, diagnosed in the second trimester and treated with combined therapy (surgery/adjuvant) after pregnancy. Most fetuses were in good state throughout pregnancy, but were delivered by caesarean section (CS) before term. Adjuvant therapy during pregnancy mostly caused transitory deterioration of fetal conditions. The majority of both mothers and infants were in a good state 12 months postpartum, although numerous mothers were still ill and on therapy. Surviving pregnancy and preventing tumors progression during pregnancy were the best predictors of mothers’ future condition (P=0.022). High birthweight and term delivery were the most important factors for good outcome of the infants (P=0.001).

Conclusions:

If the tumor is not progressing, pregnancy should be continued as long as possible to obtain adequate birthweight of the infant. Second trimester surgery is safe, while other therapies should preferably be applied after delivery.

Keywords: Malignancy; outcome; pregnancy

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About the article

Corresponding author: Katarina Jeremic, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Dr Koste Todorovica 26, Belgrade, Serbia; and Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 8, Belgrade, Serbia, Tel.: +381 11 361 5592, Fax: +381 11 361 5603


Received: 2016-06-18

Accepted: 2017-01-12

Published Online: 2017-02-21

Published in Print: 2018-01-26


Author’s statement

Conflict of interest: Authors state no conflict of interest.

Material and methods: Informed consent: Informed consent has been obtained from all individuals included in this study.

Ethical approval: The research related to human subject use has complied with all the relevant national regulations, and institutional policies, and is in accordance with the tenets of the Helsinki Declaration, and has been approved by the authors’ institutional review board or equivalent committee.


Citation Information: Journal of Perinatal Medicine, Volume 46, Issue 1, Pages 35–45, ISSN (Online) 1619-3997, ISSN (Print) 0300-5577, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2016-0212.

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