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Journal of Perinatal Medicine

Official Journal of the World Association of Perinatal Medicine

Editor-in-Chief: Dudenhausen, MD, FRCOG, Joachim W.

Ed. by Bancalari, Eduardo / Chappelle, Joseph / Chervenak, Frank A. / D'Addario , Vincenzo / Genc, Mehmet R. / Greenough, Anne / Grunebaum, Amos / Konje, Justin C. / Kurjak M.D., Asim / Romero, Roberto / Zalud, MD PhD, Ivica


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1619-3997
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Volume 47, Issue 5

Issues

Change in fetal behavior in response to vibroacoustic stimulation

Kaoru Ogo
  • Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kagawa 761-0793, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Kenji Kanenishi
  • Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kagawa 761-0793, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Nobuhiro Mori
  • Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kagawa 761-0793, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Mohamed Ahmed Mostafa AboEllail
  • Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kagawa 761-0793, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Toshiyuki Hata
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kagawa 761-0793, Japan
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
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Published Online: 2019-05-15 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2018-0344

Abstract

Objective

To assess fetal behavioral changes in response to vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) in normal singleton pregnancies using four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound.

Methods

Ten types of fetal movements and facial expressions in 68 healthy pregnant women between 24 and 40 weeks were studied using 4D ultrasound for 3 min before and after 3-s VAS. The frequencies of mouthing, yawning, tongue expulsion, back arch, jerky arm movement, startle movement, smiling, scowling, hand-to-face movement, and blinking were evaluated. The fetuses were subdivided into four gestational age groups (24–27, 28–31, 32–35, and ≥36 weeks). Comparison of the frequencies of the fetal behaviors before and after the stimulation in each gestational age group was conducted to detect the response to stimulation with advancing gestation.

Results

There were no significant differences in the frequency of each fetal behavior before and after VAS at 24–27, 28–31, and 32–35 weeks of gestation. However, the frequencies of blinking and startle movements were significantly higher after VAS in the 36–40 gestational age group (P < 0.05).

Conclusion

The age of 36 weeks of gestation might represent an advanced stage of brain and central nervous system development and maturation as the response to stimuli is prominent at this age compared with earlier gestation.

This article offers supplementary material which is provided at the end of the article.

Keywords: 4D ultrasound; fetal behavior; fetal CNS development; fetal CNS maturation; fetal stress; vibroacoustic stimulation

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About the article

Corresponding author: Toshiyuki Hata, MD, PhD, Professor and Chairman, Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kagawa 761-0793, Japan, Tel.: +81-(0)87-891-2174, Fax: +81-(0)87-891-2175


Received: 2018-10-19

Accepted: 2019-03-04

Published Online: 2019-05-15

Published in Print: 2019-07-26


Author contributions: All the authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission.

Research funding: None declared.

Employment or leadership: None declared.

Honorarium: None declared.

Competing interests: The funding organization(s) played no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the report for publication.


Citation Information: Journal of Perinatal Medicine, Volume 47, Issue 5, Pages 558–563, ISSN (Online) 1619-3997, ISSN (Print) 0300-5577, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2018-0344.

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