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Journal of Perinatal Medicine

Official Journal of the World Association of Perinatal Medicine

Editor-in-Chief: Dudenhausen, MD, FRCOG, Joachim W.

Ed. by Bancalari, Eduardo / Chappelle, Joseph / Chervenak, Frank A. / D'Addario , Vincenzo / Genc, Mehmet R. / Greenough, Anne / Grunebaum, Amos / Konje, Justin C. / Kurjak M.D., Asim / Romero, Roberto / Zalud, MD PhD, Ivica


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 1.361
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1619-3997
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Volume 47, Issue 9

Issues

Fetal adrenal gland size in gestational diabetes mellitus

Tim Hetkamp
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany
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/ Kerstin Hammer
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany
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/ Mareike Möllers
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany
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/ Helen A. Köster
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany
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/ Maria K. Falkenberg
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany
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/ Laura Kerschke / Janina Braun
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany
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/ Kathrin Oelmeier de Murcia
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany
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/ Walter Klockenbusch
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany
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/ Ralf Schmitz
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany
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Published Online: 2019-09-28 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2019-0146

Abstract

Background

The aim of this study was to compare the adrenal gland size of fetuses of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) with that of healthy control fetuses.

Methods

This prospective cross-sectional study included measurements of the adrenal gland size of 62 GDM fetuses (GDM group) and 370 normal controls (control group) between the 19th and 41st week of gestation. A standardized transversal plane was used to measure the total width and the medulla width. The cortex width and an adrenal gland ratio (total width/medulla width) were calculated from these data. Adrenal gland size measurements were adjusted to the week of gestation and compared between the two groups in a multivariable linear regression analysis. A variance decomposition metric was used to compare the relative importance of predictors of the different adrenal gland size measurements.

Results

For all the investigated parameters of the adrenal gland size, increased values were found in the case of GDM (P < 0.05), while adjusting for the week of gestation. GDM seems to have a greater impact on the size of the cortex than on the size of the medulla.

Conclusion

The fetal adrenal gland is enlarged in pregnancy complicated by GDM. The width of the cortex seems to be particularly affected.

Keywords: adrenal gland; gestational age; gestational diabetes mellitus; prenatal ultrasound

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About the article

Corresponding authors: Tim Hetkamp and PD Dr. Ralf Schmitz, MD, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany, Tel.: +49-17634109151, Fax: +49-2518348210


Received: 2019-04-25

Accepted: 2019-08-22

Published Online: 2019-09-28

Published in Print: 2019-11-26


Author contributions: T. Hetkamp: data collection, data management, data analysis, manuscript writing; K. Hammer: data collection, manuscript editing; L. Kerschke: data analysis, manuscript editing; M. Möllers: data collection, manuscript editing; H.A. Köster: manuscript editing; M.K. Falkenberg: data collection, manuscript editing; J. Braun: data collection, manuscript editing; K. Oelmeier de Murcia: data collection, manuscript editing; W. Klockenbusch: manuscript editing; R. Schmitz: conceptualization, data collection, manuscript editing. All the authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission.

Research funding: None declared.

Employment or leadership: None declared.

Honorarium: None declared.

Competing interests: The funding organization(s) played no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the report for publication.


Citation Information: Journal of Perinatal Medicine, Volume 47, Issue 9, Pages 941–946, ISSN (Online) 1619-3997, ISSN (Print) 0300-5577, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2019-0146.

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