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New journal!

Journal of Transcendental Philosophy

Ed. by Luft, Sebastian / Pollok, Konstantin / Staiti, Andrea

Free Access

    Free Access
    Online
    ISSN
    2626-8329
    See all formats and pricing

    Overview

    Aims and Scope

    The Journal of Transcendental Philosophy (JTPH) provides a forum for philosophers working in the transcendental tradition, broadly construed as any form of thinking that presents itself as a creative continuation of the manner of philosophizing inaugurated by Kant. It welcomes both historical and systematic articles on a wide range of topics from epistemology, philosophy of mind, phenomenology, philosophy of science, philosophy of nature, and philosophy of culture, to ethics, political philosophy, and metaphilosophy. The journal also invites contributions on Kant and early responses to Kant, German Idealism and Romanticism as well as hitherto understudied currents of transcendental philosophy, such as Neo-Kantianism and Anglophone Idealism. It is particularly receptive to articles that draw systematic connections to contemporary issues or reveal lines of influence among different philosophical traditions.

    The journal will be published in three issues per year. We welcome paper submissions in all fields pertinent to Transcendental Philosophy. Papers will be selected in a double-blind review process. Submit your research online at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jtph.

    The Journal will also publish book reviews. Book review requests and books to be reviewed should be sent to the book review editor, Simon Truwant.

    Special Topic Issues

    One issue of each year will be a special topic volume, published by a designated Guest Editor. The first three special topic issues have already been selected:

    2020: Transcendental Philosophy and the Challenge of Naturalism (edited by Andrea Staiti).

    2021: Cassirer’s Children: A Reassessment of His Influence (edited by Massimo Ferrari & Sebastian Luft).

    2022: Themes from the Philosophy of Robert Brandom (edited by Corinne Bloch-Mullins, Yoon Choi, and Sebastian Luft).

    Manuscript submissions: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jtph

    Details

    Language:
    English
    Type of Publication:
    Journal
    Keyword(s):
    Epistemology, philosophy of mind, phenomenology, philosophy of science, philosophy of nature, philosophy of culture, ethics, political philosophy, metaphilosophy, Kant, German Idealism, Romanticism, Neo-Kantianism, Anglophone Idealism
    Readership:
    Institutes, libraries, students, scholars

    Submission of Manuscripts

    Instructions for Authors

    Instructions for Authors

    Original articles of between 5,000 and 10,000 words or book reviews of max. 2,500 words (including footnotes and references) may be submitted to JTPH on the understanding that the article or the book review is not under consideration for publication elsewhere and has not been published previously.

    Because the refereeing process is based on double-blind peer review, it is imperative that submissions do not contain any information from which a reader may infer the identity of its author. Articles may be submitted in any formatting style, but prior to final acceptance, it is the authors’ responsibility to adhere to the following stylistic conventions. Please submit your manuscript to https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jtph.

    Structure Articles

    Please make sure the submission includes the following items:

    • Author’s name, affiliation, postal address and email address (in the field "cover letter"; do NOT include these data in the article).
    • Title, preferably at most 20 words long.
    All words in the title should begin with an upper-case letter except articles, conjunctions and prepositions. Example: "The Advantages and the Disadvantages of Reading Kant as a Cartesian in Light of Hegel’s Critique".
    • Abstract, 80-150 words.
    • Keywords (which may contain proper names), 3-8 words;
    • Acknowledgements, if applicable, should be placed at the end of the paper, just before the references.  

    Structure – Book Reviews

    Book reviews are not double-blind peer reviewed. Please make sure the submission includes the following items:
    • Author’s name, affiliation, postal address and email address
    • Title in the form: Firmian Siebenkäs, A Theory of Transcendental Forms, Berlin/Boston: de Gruyter, 2017, Pp. xvi + 350, ISBN 3110167854321 (hbk) $99.99, (pb) $24.99.
    • Acknowledgements, if applicable, should be placed at the end of the paper, just before the references.

    Formatting

    • Spelling, abbreviations, acronyms, hyphenation, serial commas, capitalization, etc., should be consistent throughout.
    • Articles and book reviews should use American English spelling.
    • If an article is divided into sections (subsections are also acceptable, but not subsubsections), they should carry a title and be numbered consecutively (e.g. 1., 2., 2.1., 2.2. etc.) and be printed in bold.
    • We use footnotes, not endnotes. Footnotes should be kept to a minimum and be numbered consecutively.
    • Numbers up to and including nine should be printed in written form, i.e. two, four, nine. Numbers greater than nine should appear as numerals, i.e., 423, $100.000.
    • Dates shall be written in the form: January 19, 2003. ‘1970s’, ‘1990s’ etc., should be written without an apostrophe before the ‘s’.
    • Laws or similar items should be italicized: Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as should be expressions like de facto, a priori, ex post or pro tanto.
    • When you introduce original concepts, put them in italics when you introduce them, e.g., "Those we might call conceptualists and those we might call non-conceptualists…"

    Citations and Quotations
    • Quotations are to be placed in "double quotation marks"; ‘single’ quotation marks are to be used only for "quotations ‘within’ a quotation". Punctuation marks after quotations are to be placed after the closing quotation mark.
    • Quotations longer than three lines should be indented in the form of block quotes, these do not need any quotation marks. They will typically end thusly: (2013, p. 12)
    • If you don’t mention the author earlier, however, they would end thusly: (Taylor 2013, pp. 23f., italics added)
    • Instead of ‘pp. 287-8’, use ‘pp. 287f.’ When quoting a longer passage, quote the exact pages, e.g. instead of ‘pp. 287ff.,’ use ‘pp. 287-9’.
    • Please avoid ‘op. cit.’.
    • Citations are to appear parenthetically in the text or, when applicable, in footnotes (e.g., with longer list of items), in the following format:

    • (e.g., Cohen 2011)
    • (Rawls 1971, p. 73, italics added)
    • (2011; cf. Rawls 1971)
    • (Cohen 1978, pp. 302-7, footnotes removed)
    • (Cf. Carens 2013, ch. 7)
    • (see Schachar 2009, p. 12, but also Cohen 2011, pp. 58f., 68-70)
    • (Kates and Pevnick 2014, p. 189)

    • If the author’s name appears in the sentence in which the citation is given, in general only the publication date and, if applicable, the page number(s) should appear in brackets:

    • Although Hare (1951, pp. 42f.) states that …
    • As Miller repeatedly argues (2007, 2016)
    • As I have argued elsewhere (Orwell 1984), …

    • If the article refers to an edition of a book other than its first edition, date of the publication referred to should be given in the text, e.g., (Kant 1976). ) In the References section, the original publication date should be added (see below).
    • If the article contains citations to co-authored works, the citation should read thusly: (Kates and Pevnick 2014, p. 189)
    • If the article contains citations to works by more than two authors, the textual citation should read: (Smith et al. 2001), where Smith is the first-named author on the original publication.
    • For internet documents, please put the website address in a footnote and mention when you last accessed it. For example:
    United Nations, http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/Publications/Files/Key_Findings_WPP_2015.pdf (accessed on September 8, 2016).

    References

    A reference list in alphabetical order according to author’s last name should appear at the end of the article.
    If an edition of a book other than its first edition is used, date of the publication referred to should be given in the text, e.g. Kant, Immanuel (2010). In the References section, the original publication date should be added (e.g. Kant, Immanuel (2010/1781/1787), see below).
    Examples of the main forms of reference are given below:

    • Single-authored book: Cohen. G.A. (2011). On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice, and Other Essays in Political Philosophy (New Jersey: Princeton University Press).
    • Co-authored book: as above with the names of authors appearing in the same order as on the original publication: Smith, M.D., Johnstone, S. and Michelsen, P.L. (2000). On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice, and Other Essays in Political Philosophy (New Jersey: Princeton University Press).
    • Journal article: Sen, A. (1982). "Rights and agency," Philosophy and Public Affairs 11 (1): 3-39. [note the double quotation marks]
    • Chapter in an edited collection: Anderson, E. (2008). ‘Emotions in Kant's later moral philosophy: honor and the phenomenology of moral value’, in M. Betzler (ed.). Kant's Ethics of Virtue (New York and Berlin: de Gruyter), pp. 123-145.
    • For a book with multiple editors, the citation should be as above with editorial information: A.I. Cohen and C. Heath Wellman (eds.).
    • For online publications, give the URL and the date of last access, e.g., Turchetti, M. (2010). ‘Jean Bodin’, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, URL = http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/bodin/ (accessed on 14th Sept., 2013).
    • Newspaper article: Cobain, I. (2011). ‘Revealed: Britain’s secret policy on overseas torture’, The Guardian, August 5, pp. 1-2.
    • If a non-English language work is cited, please quote the original in the bibliography. If a translation is available, please quote that as well. For example: Kant, I. (2010/1781/1787), Kritik der reinen Vernunft, ed. J. Timmermann (Hamburg: Meiner). Kant, I. (1998), Critique of Pure Reason, trans. P. Guyer & A. Wood (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press).

    Please note that in the main text, however, quotations should always be in English (except for certain key terms or phrases).

    More ...

    Abstracting & Indexing

    Editorial Information

    Editors-in-Chief
    Sebastian Luft (Marquette University)
    Konstantin Pollok (University of South Carolina)
    Andrea Staiti (University of Parma)

    Book Review Editor
    Simon Truwant (University of Leuven)

    Editorial Office Manager
    Stefano Vincini (University of Parma)

    Advisory Board
    Carla Bagnoli (University of Modena)
    Angela Breitenbach (Cambridge University)
    Beatrice Centi (University of Parma)
    Andrew Chignell (Princeton University)
    Alix Cohen (University of Edinburgh)
    Steven Crowell (Rice University, Houston)
    Daniel Dahlstrom (Boston University)
    Karin De Boer (University of Leuven)
    Faustino Fabbianelli (University of Parma)
    Massimo Ferrari (University of Torino)
    Michael Forster (University of Bonn/Chicago)
    Elio Franzini (University of Milan)
    Kristin Gjesdal (Temple University, Philadelphia)
    Jeanine M. Grenberg (St. Olaf College)
    Julia Jansen (University of Leuven)
    Pauline Kleingeld (University of Groningen)
    Guido Kreis (University of Aarhus)
    Christian Krijnen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
    Michela Massimi (University of Edinburgh)
    Dermot Moran (Boston College)
    Dominique Pradelle (University of Paris)
    Sonja Rinofner-Kreidl (University of Graz)
    Isabelle Thomas-Fogiel (University of Ottawa)
    Allen Wood (Indiana University Bloomington)
    Günter Zöller (Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich)
    Rachel Zuckert (Northwestern University)

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