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Law and Development Review

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Open Access Order and Interconnected Institutions in Brazil: A Challenge

Guanghua Yu
Published Online: 2018-05-10 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ldr-2018-0002

Abstract

This article examines the evolution of democratic practice in Brazil. The article begins with a discussion on the country’s performance in terms of social equality, violence, and weak economy after the consolidation of democracy in 1985. Based on historical evidence, the article offers explanations concerning the weak performance in Brazil. The case of Brazil provides a challenge to the theory of open access order of North and his colleagues in the sense that open access to political organizations and activities does not necessarily lead to either better political representation or better economic performance. The case of Brazil also shows that open access to economic organizations and activities in the absence of the necessary institutions in the areas of property rights protection and contract enforcement, the financial market, the rule of law, and human resources accumulation does not lead to long-term economic growth.

Keywords: open access order; interconnected institutions; competitive democracy; economic and human development; Brazil

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About the article

Published Online: 2018-05-10

Published in Print: 2019-01-28


Citation Information: Law and Development Review, Volume 12, Issue 1, Pages 1–40, ISSN (Online) 1943-3867, ISSN (Print) 2194-6523, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ldr-2018-0002.

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