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Linguistics

An Interdisciplinary Journal of the Language Sciences

Editor-in-Chief: van der Auwera, Johan

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ISSN
1613-396X
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Volume 48, Issue 4 (Jan 2010)

Issues

Stuffed toys and speech perception

Jennifer Hay
  • Corresponding author
  • University of Canterbury
/ Katie Drager
  • University of Canterbury
Published Online: 2010-07-13 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ling.2010.027

Abstract

Previous research has shown that speech perception can be influenced by a speaker's social characteristics, including the expected dialect area of the speaker (Niedzielski, Journal of Language and Social Psychology 18: 62–85, 1999; Hay et al. The Linguistic Review 23: 351–379, 2006a). This article reports on an experiment designed to test to degree to which exposure to the concept of a region can also influence perception. In order to invoke the concept, we exposed participants, who were all speakers of New Zealand English, to either stuffed toy kangaroos and koalas (associated with Australia) or stuffed toy kiwis (associated with New Zealand). Participants then completed a perception task in which they matched natural vowels produced by a male New Zealander to vowels from a synthesized continuum which ranged from raised and fronted Australian-like tokens to lowered and centralized New Zealand-like tokens. Our results indicate that perception of the vowels shifted depending on which set of toys the participants had seen. This supports models of speech perception in which linguistic and nonlinguistic information are intricately entwined.

About the article

Correspondence address: Jennifer Hay, Dept. of Linguistics, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand. Email:


Received: 2008-08-30

Revised: 2009-05-09

Published Online: 2010-07-13

Published in Print: 2010-07-01


Citation Information: Linguistics, ISSN (Online) 1613-396X, ISSN (Print) 0024-3949, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ling.2010.027. Export Citation

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