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Linguistics

An Interdisciplinary Journal of the Language Sciences

Editor-in-Chief: Gast, Volker


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 1.066

CiteScore 2018: 0.97

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.384
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1613-396X
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Volume 51, Issue 5

Issues

Motion event cognition and grammatical aspect: Evidence from Afrikaans

Emanuel Bylund
  • Corresponding author
  • University of the Western Cape, South Africa
  • Centre for Research on Bilingualism, Stockholm University, Universtetsvägen 10C, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Panos Athanasopoulos
  • Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, UK
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Marcelyn Oostendorp
Published Online: 2013-08-16 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ling-2013-0033

Abstract

Research on the relationship between grammatical aspect and motion event construal has posited that speakers of non-aspect languages are more prone to encoding event endpoints than are speakers of aspect languages (e.g., von Stutterheim and Carroll 2011). In the present study, we test this hypothesis by extending this line of inquiry to Afrikaans, a non-aspect language which is previously unexplored in this regard. Motion endpoint behavior among Afrikaans speakers was measured by means of a linguistic retelling task and a non-linguistic similarity judgment task, and then compared with the behavior of speakers of a non-aspect language (Swedish) and speakers of an aspect language (English). Results showed the Afrikaans speakers' endpoint patterns aligned with Swedish patterns, but were significantly different from English patterns. It was also found that the variation among the Afrikaans speakers could be partially explained by taking into account their frequency of use of English, such that those who used English more frequently exhibited an endpoint behavior that was more similar to English speakers. The current study thus lends further support to the hypothesis that speakers of different languages attend differently to event endpoints as a function of the grammatical category of aspect.

Keywords: Afrikaans; cognition; endpoints; grammatical aspect; linguistic relativity; motion event

About the article

Published Online: 2013-08-16

Published in Print: 2013-08-15


Citation Information: Linguistics, Volume 51, Issue 5, Pages 929–955, ISSN (Online) 1613-396X, ISSN (Print) 0024-3949, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ling-2013-0033.

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EMANUEL BYLUND and PANOS ATHANASOPOULOS
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[3]
GUILLERMO MONTERO-MELIS and EMANUEL BYLUND
Language and Cognition, 2017, Volume 9, Number 3, Page 446
[4]
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Cognition, 2018, Volume 180, Page 225
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Yeu-Ting Liu
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Panos Athanasopoulos, Emanuel Bylund, Guillermo Montero-Melis, Ljubica Damjanovic, Alina Schartner, Alexandra Kibbe, Nick Riches, and Guillaume Thierry
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Language Learning, 2016, Volume 66, Number 3, Page 666
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Panos Athanasopoulos and Jeanine Treffers-Daller
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International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 2015, Volume 18, Number 5, Page 588
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Cognition, 2015, Volume 141, Page 41
[13]
Emanuel Bylund and Panos Athanasopoulos
The Modern Language Journal, 2015, Volume 99, Number S1, Page 1
[14]
Panos Athanasopoulos, Ljubica Damjanovic, Julie Burnand, and Emanuel Bylund
The Modern Language Journal, 2015, Volume 99, Number S1, Page 138
[15]
Emanuel Bylund and Panos Athanasopoulos
The Modern Language Journal, 2015, Volume 99, Number S1, Page 123
[16]
Emanuel Bylund and Panos Athanasopoulos
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