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Linguistics Vanguard

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Acoustic correlates of word stress: A cross-linguistic survey

Matthew Gordon / Timo Roettger
Published Online: 2017-08-08 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/lingvan-2017-0007

Abstract

The study of the acoustic correlates of word stress has been a fruitful area of phonetic research since the seminal research on American English by Dennis Fry over 50 years ago. This paper presents results of a cross-linguistic survey designed to distill a clearer picture of the relative robustness of different acoustic exponents of what has been referred to as word stress. Drawing on a survey of 110 (sub-) studies on 75 languages, we discuss the relative efficacy of various acoustic parameters in distinguishing stress levels.

Keywords: word stress; phonetics; phonology; typology

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About the article

Received: 2017-03-07

Accepted: 2017-04-26

Published Online: 2017-08-08


Citation Information: Linguistics Vanguard, Volume 3, Issue 1, 20170007, ISSN (Online) 2199-174X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/lingvan-2017-0007.

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