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Laboratory Phonology

Journal of the Association for Laboratory Phonology

Ed. by Cole, Jennifer


IMPACT FACTOR 2015: 0.667
Rank 85 out of 179 in category Linguistics in the 2015 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Report/Social Sciences Edition

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Here's looking at you, baby: What gaze and movement reveal about minimal pair word-object association at 14 months

Laurel Fais, / Janet F. Werker, / Bronwyn Cass, / Julia Leibowich, / Adriano Vilela Barbosa,
  • Corresponding author
  • Cognitive Systems Program and Department of Linguistics, University of British Columbia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Eric Vatikiotis-Bateson,
  • Corresponding author
  • Cognitive Systems Program and Department of Linguistics, University of British Columbia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2012-05-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/lp-2012-0007

Abstract

The ability, or lack thereof, of 14-month-old infants to associate novel, minimal pair word-forms with novel objects in a variety of experimental settings has been a crucial research window into how infants go about the quintessential linguistic task of learning words. Here we ask whether the presence of a human interactor in the experimental setting facilitates minimal pair word-object association at this age. In addition to standard looking time measures to test this question, we also introduce the use of measures of infant movement derived by the application of an efficient algorithm that measures motion from 2D video. Infant gaze patterns across the experimental session identified two groups of infants, those engaging in more and those engaging in less mutual gaze with the Experimenter; both groups demonstrated success in the task by both looking time and movement measures. Infants did not succeed in the task by either measure when a videotaped Experimenter presented the labels. We suggest that infants at this age are in transition from being good “information consumers” to becoming good “information seekers,” and that the presence of the live Experimenter plays a crucial role in making it possible for infants to demonstrate their nascent word learning abilities. Further, we explore insights into the looking time results provided by the movement measures as well as novel contributions to our understanding of language acquisition afforded by the examination of infant movement.

About the article

Published Online: 2012-05-01

Published in Print: 2012-05-25


Citation Information: Laboratory Phonology, Volume 3, Issue 1, Pages 91–124, ISSN (Online) 1868-6354, ISSN (Print) 1868-6346, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/lp-2012-0007.

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©[2012] by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston.Get Permission

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[2]
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