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Laboratory Phonology

Journal of the Association for Laboratory Phonology

Ed. by Cole, Jennifer


IMPACT FACTOR 2015: 0.667
Rank 85 out of 179 in category Linguistics in the 2015 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Report/Social Sciences Edition

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Predicting acoustically reduced words in spontaneous speech: The role of semantic/syntactic and acoustic cues in context

Marco van de Ven / Mirjam Ernestus
  • Centre for Language Studies, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, The Netherlands
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Robert Schreuder
  • Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2012-11-21 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/lp-2012-0020

Abstract

In spontaneous speech, words may be realised shorter than in formal speech (e.g., English yesterday may be pronounced like [jɛʃeɩ]). Previous research has shown that context is required to understand highly reduced pronunciation variants. We investigated the extent to which listeners can predict low predictability reduced words on the basis of the semantic/syntactic and acoustic cues in their context. In four experiments, participants were presented with either the preceding context or the preceding and following context of reduced words, and either heard these fragments of conversational speech, or read their orthographic transcriptions. Participants were asked to predict the missing reduced word on the basis of the context alone, choosing from four plausible options. Participants made use of acoustic cues in the context, although casual speech typically has a high speech rate, and acoustic cues are much more unclear than in careful speech. Moreover, they relied on semantic/syntactic cues. Whenever there was a conflict between acoustic and semantic/syntactic contextual cues, measured as the word's probability given the surrounding words, listeners relied more heavily on acoustic cues. Further, context appeared generally insufficient to predict the reduced words, underpinning the significance of the acoustic characteristics of the reduced words themselves.

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About the article

Centre for Language Studies, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, The Netherlands


Published Online: 2012-11-21

Published in Print: 2012-10-26


Citation Information: Laboratory Phonology, Volume 3, Issue 2, Pages 455–481, ISSN (Online) 1868-6354, ISSN (Print) 1868-6346, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/lp-2012-0020.

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