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Mammalia

Editor-in-Chief: Denys, Christiane


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Volume 76, Issue 2

Issues

Mapping the distribution of dholes, Cuon alpinus (Canidae, Carnivora), in Thailand

Kate E. Jenks
  • Graduate Programs in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation, University of Massachusetts, 611 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
  • Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, 1500 Remount Road, Front Royal, VA 22630, USA
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/ Shumpei Kitamura / Antony J. Lynam
  • Wildlife Conservation Society, Global Conservation Program, 2300 Southern Boulevard, Bronx, NY 10540, USA
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/ Dusit Ngoprasert
  • Conservation Ecology Program, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10140, Thailand
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/ Wanlop Chutipong
  • Conservation Ecology Program, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10140, Thailand
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/ Robert Steinmetz / Ronglarp Sukmasuang
  • Department of Forest Biology, Faculty of Forestry, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
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/ Lon I. Grassman Jr.
  • Feline Research Center, Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, MSC 218, 700 University Boulevard, Kingsville, TX 78363, USA
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/ Passanan Cutter
  • Conservation Biology Program, University of Minnesota, 187 McNeal Hall, 1985 Buford Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
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/ Naruemon Tantipisanuh
  • Conservation Ecology Program, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10140, Thailand
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/ Naris Bhumpakphan
  • Department of Forest Biology, Faculty of Forestry, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
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/ George A. Gale
  • Conservation Ecology Program, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10140, Thailand
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/ David H. Reed
  • Graduate Programs in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation, University of Massachusetts, 611 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
  • Department of Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
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/ Peter Leimgruber
  • Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, 1500 Remount Road, Front Royal, VA 22630, USA
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/ Nucharin Songsasen
  • Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, 1500 Remount Road, Front Royal, VA 22630, USA
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Published Online: 2012-04-03 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/mammalia-2011-0063

Abstract

No recent attempt has been made to survey dhole distribution, or to estimate remaining population numbers. We surveyed 15 protected areas in Thailand with camera traps from 1996 to 2010. We used the photo locations of dholes (n=96) in the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) model along with six environmental variables to model current dhole distribution, as well as species predictive occurrence layers for sambar, red muntjac, wild boar, tiger, and leopard. The MaxEnt model identified the predicted probability of the presence of leopards and sambar as positive and the most important variables in modeling dhole presence, indicating that maintaining a sufficient prey base may be the most important factor determining continued survival of dholes. Roughly 7% of the total land area in Thailand is potentially suitable for dholes. However, surveys to date have focused on protected areas, which make up just a third of the potential suitable areas for dholes. Only in four protected areas do they occur across the entire landscape, suggesting that in the majority of places where they occur, habitats are not uniformly suitable. Using the model, we identified several potential areas where dholes have not been reported, and therefore status surveys are needed, and where future research of the species might be focused.

Keywords: Cuon alpinus; MaxEnt; maximum entropy modeling; Southeast Asia; species distribution modeling

About the article

Corresponding author


Received: 2011-06-21

Accepted: 2012-02-06

Published Online: 2012-04-03

Published in Print: 2012-05-01


Citation Information: mammalia, Volume 76, Issue 2, Pages 175–184, ISSN (Online) 1864-1547, ISSN (Print) 0025-1461, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/mammalia-2011-0063.

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