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Open Mathematics

formerly Central European Journal of Mathematics

Editor-in-Chief: Gianazza, Ugo / Vespri, Vincenzo


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Volume 16, Issue 1

Issues

Volume 13 (2015)

On the recursive properties of one kind hybrid power mean involving two-term exponential sums and Gauss sums

Shimeng Shen
Published Online: 2018-08-24 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/math-2018-0081

Abstract

The main purpose of this paper is to study the computational problem of one kind hybrid power mean involving two-term exponential sums and quartic Gauss sums using the analytic method and the properties of the classical Gauss sums, and to prove some interesting fourth-order linear recurrence formulae for this problem. As an application of our result, we can also obtain an exact computational formula for one kind congruence equation mod p, an odd prime.

Keywords: The quartic Gauss sums; Two-term exponential sums; Hybrid power mean; The fourth-order linear recurrence formula

MSC 2010: 11L05; 11L07

1 Introduction

Let p ≥ 3 be an odd prime. For any integer m with (m,p) = 1, the quartic Gauss sums B(m) = B(m, p) is defined as

B(m)=a=0p1ema4p,

where as usual, e(y) = e2πiy.

Recently, some scholars have studied the hybrid power mean problems of various trigonometric sums, and obtained many interesting results. For example, Chen Li and Hu Jiayuan [1] studied the computational problem of the hybrid power mean

Sk(p)=m=1p1a=0p1ema3pkc=1p1emc+c¯p2,

where c denotes the multiplicative inverse of c mod p. That is, cc ≡ 1 mod p.

For p ≡ 1 mod 3, they used the elementary method to obtain an interesting third-order linear recurrence formula for Sk(p).

Li Xiaoxue and Hu Jiayuan [2] studied the computational problem of the hybrid power mean

b=1p1a=0p1eba4p2c=1p1ebc+c¯p2,(1)

and proved an exact computational formula for (1).

Zhang Han and Zhang Wenpeng [3] proved the identity

m=1p1a=0p1ema3+nap4=2p3p2if3p1,2p37p2if3|p1.

Other related results can also be found in references [4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13].

In this paper, we will consider the calculating problem of the following hybrid power mean:

Vk(p)=m=1p1a=0p1ema4pkb=0p1emb4+bp3,(2)

where k ≥ 0 is an integer.

If p = 4h + 3, then from the properties of the Legendre’s symbol mod p we have (see [14], formula (30) in Chapter 9)

a=0p1ema4p=1+a=1p11+χ2(a)ema2p=a=0p1ema2p=iχ2(m)p,

where χ2 = p denotes the Legendre’s symbol mod p.

So in this case, the problem we considered in (2) is trivial. If p = 4h + 1, then the situation is more complicated. We will use the analytic method and the properties of classical Gauss sums to study this problem, and prove some new interesting fourth-order linear recurrence formulae for (2) with p = 4 h + 1. That is, we will give the following four results.

Theorem 1.1

Let p be a prime with p = 24 h + 1. Then for any integer k ≥ 4, we have the fourth-order linear recurrence formula

Vk(p)=6pVk2(p)+8pαVk3(p)pp4α2Vk4(p),

where the first four values are V0(p) = p2 – 6, V1(p) = p(p2 – 16p – 4α2), V2(p) = p2(2 + 3p – 58α) and V3(p) = p2(7p2 + 4 – 92p – 72α2), α= α(p) = a=1p12a+a¯p is an integer, which satisfies the identity (see Theorem 4-11 in [15])

p=α2+β2a=1p12a+a¯p2+a=1p12a+ra¯p2,

which r is any quadratic non-residue mod p.

Theorem 1.2

Let p be a prime with p = 24h + 17. Then for any integer k ≥ 4, we have the fourth-order linear recurrence formula

Vk(p)=6pVk2(p)+8pαVk3(p)pp4α2Vk4(p),

where the first four values are V0(p) = – p2 – 6, V1(p) = p(p2 – 18p – 4α2), V2(p) = p2(2 – 3p – 62α) and V3(p) = p2(7p2 – 4 – 106p – 72α2).

Theorem 1.3

Let p be a prime with p = 24h + 5. Then for any integer k ≥ 4, we have the fourth-order linear recurrence formula

Vk(p)=2pVk2(p)+8pαVk3(p)p9p4α2Vk4(p),

where the first four terms are V0(p) = –(p2 + 6), V1(p) = – p(p2 – 8p + 4α2), V2(p) = – p2(2p – 22α) and V3(p) = p2(5p2 – 6 – 28p – 36α2).

Theorem 1.4

Let p be a prime with p = 24h + 13. Then for any integer k ≥ 4, we have the fourth-order linear recurrence formula

Vk(p)=2pVk2(p)+8pαVk3(p)p9p4α2Vk4(p),

where the first four terms are V0(p) = p2 – 6, V1(p) = – p(p2 – 6p + 4α2), V2(p) = – p2(2 + p – 18α) and V3(p) = p2(5p2 + 6 – 18p – 36α2).

From our theorems we may immediately deduce the following:

Corollary 1.5

Let p be a prime with p ≡ 1 mod 4, then we have the identity

m=1p1a=0p1ema4p3b=0p1emb4+bp3=p27p2+4pα92p72α2ifp=24h+1,p27p24pα106p72α2ifp=24h+17,p25p26pα28p36α2ifp=24h+5,p25p2+6pα18p36α2ifp=24h+13.

Note that the estimate |α| ≤ p, from Corollary 1.5 we also have the following:

Corollary 1.6

Let p be a prime with p ≡ 1 mod 8, then we have the asymptotic formula

m=1p1a=0p1ema4p3b=0p1emb4+bp3=7p4+Op72.

Corollary 1.7

Let p be a prime with p ≡ 5 mod 8, then we have the asymptotic formula

m=1p1a=0p1ema4p3b=0p1emb4+bp3=5p4+Op72.

For any prime p with p ≡ 1 mod 4 and any positive integer k, let Mk(p) denote the number of the solutions of the congruence equation

x14+x24++xk4+y14+y24+y340modp,y1+y2+y30modp,

where 0 ≤ xi, yjp – 1, i = 1, 2, …, k, j = 1, 2, 3.

Then from our theorems we can give an exact computational formula for Mk(p). For example, let Hs(p) denote the number of the congruence equation

x14+x24++xs40modp,0xip1,i=1,2,s.

Then we have the identity

Vk(p)=p2p1Mk(p)pp1Hk(p).

Since Hk(p) has a fourth-order linear recurrence formula (see [8]), so from the above formula and our theorems we can deduce the exact value of Mk(p).

2 Several lemmas

To complete the proofs of our theorems, we need to prove four simple lemmas. Hereafter, we will use many properties of the classical Gauss sums and the fourth-order character mod p, all of which can be found in books concerning Elementary Number Theory or Analytic Number Theory, such as references [7], [14] or [15]. Some important results related to Gauss sums can also be found in [16] and [17]. These contents will not be repeated here. First we have the following:

Lemma 2.1

Let p be a prime with p ≡ 1 mod 4, λ be any fourth-order character mod p, then we have

τ2(λ)+τ2λ¯=pa=1p1a+a¯p=2pα,

whereτ(λ)=a=1p1λ(a)eap denotes the classical Gauss sums, and p is the Legendre’s symbol mod p.

Proof

In fact this is Lemma 2 of [18], so its proof is omitted. □

Lemma 2.2

Let p be a prime with p ≡ 1 mod 4, then for any fourth-order character λ mod p, we have the identity

m=1p1λ(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=5pτ(λ)2pατλ¯ifp1mod8,pτ(λ)2pατλ¯ifp5mod8,

where α is the same as in Lemma 2.1.

Proof

First applying trigonometric identity

m=1qenmq=qifqn,0ifqn(3)

and note that λ4 = χ0, the principal character mod p, we have

m=1p1λ(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p1λ(m)a=0p1ema4+ap2+m=1p1λ(m)a=0p1ema4+ap2a=1p1ema4+ap=τ(λ)a=0p1b=0p1λ¯a4+b4+1c=1p1ec(a+b+1)p+τ(λ)a=0p1b=0p1λ¯a4+b4ea+bp=τ(λ)pa=0p1b=0p1a+b+10modpλ¯a4+b4+1τ(λ)a=0p1b=0p1λ¯a4+b4+1τ(λ)+τ(λ)a=0p1λ¯a4+1b=1p1eb(a+1)p.(4)

From (3) we have

τ(λ)a=0p1λ¯a4+1b=1p1eb(a+1)p=λ¯(2)τ(λ)(p1)τ(λ)a=0p2λ¯a4+1=λ¯(2)τ(λ)pτ(λ)a=0p1λ¯a4+1.(5)

Note that the identity λχ2 = λ and

B(m)=a=0p1ema4p=χ2(m)p+λ¯(m)τ(λ)+λ(m)τλ¯.(6)

From (6) we have

τ(λ)a=0p1λ¯a4+1=b=1p1λ(b)a=0p1eba4+1p=b=1p1λ(b)χ2(b)p+λ¯(b)τ(λ)+λ(b)τλ¯ebp=pτλ¯τ(λ)+pτλ¯=2pτλ¯τ(λ).(7)

If p ≡ 5 bmod 8, then note that λ(–1) = –1 and, τ(λ)τ(λ) = –p, applying (6) and Lemma 2.1 we also have

a=0p1b=0p1λ¯a4+b4+1=1τ(λ)c=1p1λ(c)a=0p1b=0p1eca4+cb4+cp=1τ(λ)c=1p1λ(c)ecpa=0p1eca4p2=1τ(λ)c=1p1λ(c)ecpχ2(b)p+λ¯(b)τ(λ)+λ(b)τλ¯2=1τ(λ)c=1p1λ(c)2χ2(c)pαp+2λ(c)pτ(λ)+2λ¯(c)pτλ¯ecp=p+2pα1τλ¯τ(λ).(8)

Note that λ2 = χ2 = λ2 and the congruence, a + b + 1 ≡ 0 mod p implies the congruence a4 + b4 + 1 ≡ 2(a2 + a + 1)2 mod p. So we have

a=0p1b=0p1a+b+10modpλ¯a4+b4+1=a=0p1λ¯2a2+a+12=λ¯(2)a=0p1χ2a2+a+1=λ¯(2)a=0p1χ24a2+4a+4=λ¯(2)a=0p1χ2(2a+1)2+3=λ¯(2)a=0p1χ2a2+3=λ¯(2).(9)

Combining (4), (5), (7), (8) and (9) we have the identity

m=1p1λ(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=pτ(λ)2pατλ¯.(10)

If p ≡ 1 mod 8, then λ(–1) = 1 and τ(λ)τ(λ) = p, from the method of proving (8) we have

a=0p1b=0p1λ¯a4+b4+1=1τ(λ)c=1p1λ(c)a=0p1b=0p1eca4+cb4+cp=1τ(λ)c=1p1λ(c)ecpχ2(b)p+λ¯(b)τ(λ)+λ(b)τλ¯2=1τ(λ)c=1p1λ(c)3p+2χ2(c)pα+2λ(c)pτ(λ)+2λ¯(c)pτλ¯ecp=5p+2pα1τλ¯τ(λ).(11)

Combining (4), (5), (7), (8) and (11) we have the identity

m=1p1λ(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=5pτ(λ)2pατλ¯.(12)

Now Lemma 2.2 follows from (10) and (12). □

Lemma 2.3

Let p be a prime with p ≡ 1 mod 4, then we have the identity

m=1p1a=0p1ema4+ap3=p26pαifp=24h+1orp=24h+13,p26pαifp=24h+5orp=24h+17.

Proof

From (3) we have

m=1p1a=0p1ema4+ap3=pa=0p1b=0p1c=0p1a4+b4+c40modpea+b+cp=pa=0p1b=0p1a4+b40modpea+bp+pa=0p1b=0p1a4+b4+10modpc=1p1ec(a+b++1)p=pa=0p1a40modpeap+pa=0p1a4+10modpb=1p1eb(a+1)p+p2a=0p1b=0p1a4+b4+10modpa+b+10modp1pa=0p1b=0p1a4+b4+10modp1=ppa=0p1a4+10modp1+p2a=0p1b=0p1a4+b4+10modpa+b+10modp1pa=0p1b=0p1a4+b4+10modp1.(13)

Now we calculate each term in (13). If p ≡ 5 mod 8, then note that λ(–1) = –1 we have

pa=0p1a4+10modp1=0.(14)

Applying (6) and Lemma 2.1 we have

pa=0p1b=0p1a4+b4+10modp1=a=0p1b=0p1m=0p1ema4+b4+1p=p2+m=1p1a=0p1ema4p2emp=p2+m=1p12χ2(c)pαp+2λ(c)pτ(λ)+2λ¯(c)pτλ¯emp=p2+2pα+p+2pτ2(λ)+2pτ2λ¯=p2+p+6pα.(15)

It is clear that the congruences a4 + b4 + 1 ≡ 0 mod p and a + b + 1 ≡ 0 mod p implies that ab ≡ 1 mod p and a3 ≡ b3 ≡ 1 mod p with ab. So we have

p2a=0p1b=0p1a4+b4+10modpa+b+10modp1=p2a=2p1b=2p1a3b31modpab1modp1=2p2ifp1mod3,0ifp2mod3.(16)

Applying (13), (14), (15) and (16) we have the identity

m=1p1a=0p1ema4+ap3=p26pαifp=24h+13,p26pαifp=24h+5.(17)

If p ≡ 1 mod 8, then we also have

pa=0p1a4+10modp1=4p.(18)

pa=0p1b=0p1a4+b4+10modp1=a=0p1b=0p1m=0p1ema4+b4+1p=p2+m=1p13p+2χ2(c)pα+2λ(c)pτ(λ)+2λ¯(c)pτλ¯emp=p2+2pα3p+2pτ2(λ)+2pτ2λ¯=p23p+6pα.(19)

p2a=0p1b=0p1a4+b4+10modpa+b+10modp1=p2a=2p1b=2p1a3b31modpab1modp1=2p2ifp=24h+1,0ifp=24h+17.(20)

Applying (13), (18), (19) and (20) we have

m=1p1a=0p1ema4+ap3=p26pα ifp=24h+1,p26pα ifp=24h+17.(21)

It is clear that Lemma 2.3 follows from (17) and (21). □

Lemma 2.4

Let p be a prime with p ≡ 1 mod 4, then we have the identity

m=1p1χ2(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=p32(p6)ifp=24h+1,p32(p8)ifp=24h+17,p32(p4)ifp=24h+13,p32(p6)ifp=24h+5.

Proof

From the properties of the Legendre’s symbol mod p we have

m=1p1χ2(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p1χ2(m)a=0p1ema4+ap2+m=1p1χ2(m)a=0p1ema4+ap2c=1p1emc4+cp=pa=1p1eap+pa=0p1χ2a4+1b=1p1eb(a+1)p+pa=0p1b=0p1χ2a4+b4+1c=1p1ec(a+b+1)p=p+χ2(2)p32pa=0p1χ2a4+1pa=0p1b=0p1χ2a4+b4+1+p32a=0p1b=0p1a+b+10modpχ2a4+b4+1.(22)

From the properties of fourth-order mod p and Lemma 2.1 we have

a=0p1χ2a4+1=1+a=1p1χ2(a+1)1+λ(a)+χ2(a)+λ¯(a)=1pτ2(λ+τ2λ¯1=2α1.(23)

a=0p1b=0p1a+b+10modpχ2a4+b4+1=a=0p1χ2a4+(a+1)4+1=χ2(2)a=0p1χ2a4+2a3+3a2+2a+1=χ2(2)a=0p1χ2a2+a+12=χ2(2)p ifp=12h+1,χ2(2)(p2) ifp=12h+5.(24)

Note that τ(λ)τ(λ) = –p, if p = 8h+5. τ(λ)τ(λ) = p, if p = 8h+1. From the method of proving (15) and (19) we have

pa=0p1b=0p1χ2a4+b4+1=a=0p1b=0p1m=1p1χ2(m)ema4+mb4+mp=m=1p1χ2(m)χ2p+λ(m)τλ¯+λ¯(m)τ(λ)2emp=7p322pα if p=8h+1,5p322pα if p=8h+5.(25)

Combining (22), (23), (24) and (25) we have

m=1p1χ2(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=p32(p6) if p=24h+1,p32(p8) if p=24h+17,p32(p4) if p=24h+13,p32(p6) if p=24h+5.

This proves Lemma 2.4. □

3 Proofs of the theorems

Now we prove our main results. First we prove Theorem 1.1. If p = 24h + 1, then from Lemmas 2.1, 2.2 and 2.4 we have

V1(p)=m=1p1B(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p1χ2(m)p+λ¯(m)τ(λ)+λ(m)τλ¯a=0p1ema4+ap3=p2(p6)5p22pατ2λ5p22pατ2λ¯=pp216p4α2.(26)

Applying Lemmas 2.12.4 we also have

V2(p)=m=1p1B2(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p1χ2(m)p+λ¯(m)τ(λ)+λ(m)τλ¯2a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p13p+2χ2(m)pα+2λ(m)pτ(λ)+2λ¯(m)pτλ¯a=0p1ema4+ap3=p22pα+3p58α.(27)

If p = 8h + 1, then from (6) we have

B3(m)=χ2(m)p+λ¯(m)τ(λ)+λ(m)τλ¯3=7χ2(m)p32+4pα+5pλ¯(m)τ(λ)+λ(m)τλ¯+2λ¯(m)τλ¯+λ(m)τλpα.(28)

So if p = 24h + 1, then from (28), Lemmas 2.12.4 we have

V3(p)=m=1p1B3(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=7p3(p6)+4pαp26pα5pτλ¯5pτ(λ)+2pατλ¯5pτλ5pτλ¯+2pατλ2pατ(λ)5pτ(λ)+2pατλ¯2pατλ¯5pτλ¯+2pατλ=p27p2+4pα92p72α2.(29)

If p = 24h + 17, then from Lemmas 2.12.4 we have

V1(p)=m=1p1B(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=p2(p8)5p22pατ2λ5p22pατ2λ¯=pp218p4α2.(30)

V2(p)=m=1p1B2(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p13p+2χ2(c)pα+2λ(c)pτ(λ)+2λ¯(c)pτλ¯a=0p1ema4+ap3=p22pα3p62α.(31)

Applying (28) and the method of proving (29) we also have

V3(p)=m=1p1B3(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=7p3(p8)4pαp2+6pα5pτλ¯5pτ(λ)+2pατλ¯5pτλ5pτλ¯+2pατλ2pατ(λ)5pτ(λ)+2pατλ¯2pατλ¯5pτλ¯+2pατλ=p27p24pα106p72α2.(32)

Similarly, if p = 24h + 5, then we have

V1(p)=m=1p1B(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=p2(p6)+p22pατ2λ+p22pατ2λ¯=pp28p+4α2.(33)

V2(p)=m=1p1B2(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p1χ2(m)p+λ¯(m)τ(λ)+λ(m)τλ¯2a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p12χ2(c)pαp+2λ(c)pτ(λ)+2λ¯(c)pτλ¯a=0p1ema4+ap3=p22pαp22α.(34)

If p = 24h + 5, then from (6) we have

B3(m)=χ2(m)p+λ¯(m)τ(λ)+λ(m)τλ¯3=5χ2(m)p32+6pα+pλ¯(m)τ(λ)+λ(m)τλ¯+2λ¯(m)τλ¯+λ(m)τλpα.(35)

So from (35) and the method of proving (29) we have

V3(p)=m=1p1B3(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=5p3(p6)6pαp2+6pαpτλ¯pτ(λ)+2pατλ¯pτλpτλ¯+2pατλ2pατ(λ)pτ(λ)+2pατλ¯2pατλ¯pτλ¯+2pατλ=p25p26pα28p36α2.(36)

If p = 24h + 13, then (35), Lemmas 2.12.4 we have

V1(p)=m=1p1B(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=p2(p4)+p22pατ2λ+p22pατ2λ¯=pp26p+4α2.(37)

V2(p)=m=1p1B2(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p1χ2(m)p+λ¯(m)τ(λ)+λ(m)τλ¯2a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p12χ2(c)pαp+2λ(c)pτ(λ)+2λ¯(c)pτλ¯a=0p1ema4+ap3=p22pα+p18α.(38)

V3(p)=m=1p1B3(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=5p3(p4)+6pαp26pαpτλ¯pτ(λ)+2pατλ¯pτλpτλ¯+2pατλ2pατ(λ)pτ(λ)+2pατλ¯2pατλ¯pτλ¯+2pατλ=p25p2+6pα18p36α2.(39)

Finally, note that if p = 8h + 1, then from (6) and direct calculation (or see Lemma 3 in [7]) we have the identity

B4(m)=6pB2(m)+8pαB(m)pp4α2.(40)

For any prime p = 24h + 1 and integer k ≥ 4, from (26), (27), (29) and (40) we may immediately deduce the fourth-order linear recurrence formula

Vk(p)=m=1p1Bk(m)a=0p1ema4+ap3=m=1p1Bk4(m)6pB2(m)+8pαB(m)pp4α2a=0p1ema4+ap3=6pVk2(p)+8pαVk3(p)pp4α2Vk4(p),

where the first four values V0(p) = p2 – 6p α, V1(p) = p(p2 – 16p – 4α2), V2(p) = p2(2+3p – 58α) and V3(p) = p2(7p2+4p α – 92p – 72α2).

This proves Theorem 1.1.

If p = 24h + 17, then from (30), (31), (32) and (40) we have

Vk(p)=6pVk2(p)+8pαVk3(p)pp4α2Vk4(p),

where the first four values V0(p) = – p2 – 6p α, V1(p) = p(p2 – 18p – 4α2), V2(p) = p2(2p α – 3p – 62α) and V3(p) = p2(7p2 – 4p α – 106p – 72α2).

This proves Theorem 1.2.

If p = 8h + 5, then from (6) and direct calculation (or see Lemma 3 in [7]) we also have

B4(m)=6pB2(m)+8pαB(m)pp4α2.(41)

For any prime p = 24h + 5 and integer k ≥ 4, from (33), (34), (35) and (41) we can deduce the fourth-order linear recurrence formula

Vk(p)=6pVk2(p)+8pαVk3(p)pp4α2Vk4(p),

where the first four terms are V0(p) = –(p2+6p α), V1(p) = – p(p2 – 8p + 4α2), V2(p) = –p2(2p αp – 22α) and V3(p) = p2(5p2 – 6p α – 28p – 36α2).

This proves Theorem 1.3.

If p = 24h + 13, then from (37), (38), (39) and (41) we also have

Vk(p)=2pVk2(p)+8pαVk3(p)p9p4α2Vk4(p),

where the first four terms are V0(p) = p2 – 6p α, V1(p) = – p(p2 – 6p + 4α2), V2(p) = –p2(2p α+p – 18α) and V3(p) = p2(5p2+6p α – 18p – 36α2).

This completes the proofs of our all results.

Acknowledgement

The author would like to thank the referees for their very helpful and detailed comments, which have significantly contributed to improving the presentation of this paper. This work is supported by the N. S. F. (11771351) of P. R. China and Northwest University Graduate Innovation and Creativity Founds (YZZ17086).

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About the article

Received: 2018-05-24

Accepted: 2018-06-29

Published Online: 2018-08-24


Citation Information: Open Mathematics, Volume 16, Issue 1, Pages 955–966, ISSN (Online) 2391-5455, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/math-2018-0081.

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© 2018 Shen, published by De Gruyter. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. BY-NC-ND 4.0

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