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Multilingua

Journal of Cross-Cultural and Interlanguage Communication

Ed. by Piller, Ingrid


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 0.800
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 1.109

CiteScore 2018: 0.95

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.881
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 1.152

Online
ISSN
1613-3684
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Volume 25, Issue 4

Issues

Code switching and the globalisation of popular music: The case of North African rai and rap

Eirlys E Davies / Abdelali Bentahila
Published Online: 2008-02-21 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/MULTI.2006.020

Abstract

Present trends towards the globalisation and hybridisation of popular music genres are illustrated through an examination of two types of music currently popular in North Africa: rai, a genre originating in Algeria and now becoming better known in the West, and rap, a product of the West which has now been appropriated by Algerian and Moroccan performers. Parallels are drawn between the paths followed by these two genres. The study focuses on the use made of code switching between Arabic and French in both genres. Different patterns of switching are identified and their funtions explored. It is argued that in both genres switching may be used both as a localising device, through the use of a highly specific in-group variety, and as a device which opens up the lyrics to a wider range of audiences.

About the article

Published Online: 2008-02-21

Published in Print: 2006-12-01


Citation Information: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-Cultural and Interlanguage Communication, Volume 25, Issue 4, Pages 367–392, ISSN (Online) 1613-3684, ISSN (Print) 0167-8507, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/MULTI.2006.020.

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Monica Heller
Annual Review of Anthropology, 2010, Volume 39, Number 1, Page 101
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