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Volume 5, Issue 6

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Phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using miracle fruit plant (Synsepalum dulcificum) for antimicrobial, catalytic, anticoagulant, and thrombolytic applications

Agbaje Lateef
  • Corresponding author
  • Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology and Nanobiotechnology, Department of Pure and Applied Biology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 4000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Nanotechnology Research Group (NANO), Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 4000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria, Tel.: +234 8037400520,
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Monsurat A. Akande
  • Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology and Nanobiotechnology, Department of Pure and Applied Biology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 4000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Musibau A. Azeez
  • Department of Pure and Applied Biology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 4000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria; Nanotechnology Research Group (NANO ), Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 4000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Sunday A. Ojo
  • Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology and Nanobiotechnology, Department of Pure and Applied Biology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 4000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Bolaji I. Folarin
  • Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology and Nanobiotechnology, Department of Pure and Applied Biology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 4000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Evariste B. Gueguim-Kana
  • Department of Microbiology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X01, Scottsville, PieterMaritzburg 3209, South Africa
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Lorika S. Beukes
  • Microscopy and Microanalysis Unit, School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X01, Scottsville, PieterMaritzburg 3209, South Africa
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2016-09-24 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ntrev-2016-0039

Abstract

In the present work, we report the phytosynthesis of AgNPs mediated by leaf and seed extracts of Synsepalum dulcificum. The extracts catalyzed the formation of brown colloidal AgNPs, which stabilized in 10 min. The leaf and seed AgNPs yielded surface plasmon resonance at 440 and 438.5 nm, respectively. Prominent peaks at 3408, 2357, 2089, and 1639 cm−1 were recorded for leaf AgNPs, whereas 3404, 2368, 2081, and 1641 cm−1 were revealed for seed-mediated AgNPs from Fourier transform infrared data. These showed the involvement of phenolic compounds and proteins in the phytosynthesis. The particles were fairly spherical and crystalline in nature having size of 4–26 nm, with prominence of silver in the colloidal solutions. The particles inhibited the growth of drug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella granulomatis with zone of inhibition of 11–24 mm. Also, the phytosynthesized AgNPs completely inhibited the growth of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger. In addition, by using 20 μg/ml of AgNPs, malachite green was degraded by approximately 80% in 24 h. Similarly, the particles displayed blood anticoagulant activities as well as achieved thrombolysis. The AgNPs can be explored for biomedical and catalytic applications. The report is the first on the eco-friendly synthesis of nanoparticles by S. dulcificum.

Keywords: antimicrobial activity; phytosynthesis; silver nanoparticles; Synsepalum dulcificum; thrombolysis

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About the article

Agbaje Lateef

Agbaje Lateef obtained BTech in pure and applied biology, MTech in biotechnology, and PhD in microbiology in 1997, 2001, and 2005, respectively. He has 18 years of teaching experience in the university with vast interests in microbiology and biotechnology, especially fermentation processes and enzyme technology. He has approximately 70 publications to his credits. He is currently involved in the green synthesis of nanoparticles, and he is the head of the Nanotechnology Research Group (NANO+) in LAUTECH, Ogbomoso, Nigeria (www.nanotech.lautech.edu.ng). His articles have enjoyed 694 citations, and he has an h-index of 14. https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=C388_KsAAAAJ&hl=en.

Monsurat A. Akande

Monsurat A. Akande graduated at the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria, where she obtained BTech in microbiology and MSc in medical microbiology and parasitology in 2008 and 2015, respectively. She worked briefly in the Laboratory of Prof. A. Lateef, focusing on the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles. She has two published articles to her credit.

Musibau A. Azeez

Musibau A. Azeez obtained BTech in pure and applied biology at the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, in 1997. He thereafter obtained MSc and PhD in Plant Genetics and Breeding at the University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria, in 2001 and 2010, respectively. He was a DBT-TWAS postdoctoral fellow in nanobiotechnology at the Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, India, in 2013–2014. He is an applied geneticist and plant breeder with vast experience in germplasm development, conservation, and utilization. He also conducts research in population genetics, medicinal plants, and nanobiotechnology. He has more than forty published article to his credit. He is a member of Nanotechnology Research Group (NANO+). https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=WSYv30AAAAAJ&hl=en.

Sunday A. Ojo

Sunday A. Ojo obtained BTech in microbiology at the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria, in First Class Division in 2010. He is currently on MTech program under the supervision of Prof. A. Lateef, with research work focusing on nanobiotechnology. He has nine publications to his credits. https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=prGuXmcAAAAJ&hl=en.

Bolaji I. Folarin

Bolaji I. Folarin obtained a BTech degree in Microbiology at the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria, in First Class Division in 2016, where he worked under the supervision of Prof. A. Lateef on the green synthesis of silver, gold, and silver-gold alloy nanoparticles. He currently has two publications to his credit.

Evariste B. Gueguim-Kana

Evariste B. Gueguim-Kana obtained BTech in pure and applied biology, MTech in biotechnology, and PhD in microbiology in 1997, 2001, and 2005, respectively, at the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria. He was a faculty member in Lautech., Ogbomoso from 1998 to 2008, after which he joined the services of University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, in the Department of Microbiology. He is an expert in bioprocess design, modeling, and optimization, where he has contributed immensely in the novel design of bioreactors and deployment of bioprocess control software and applications. He is currently involved in renewable energy research and green nanobiotechnology. Dr. Gueguim-Kana has more than fifty articles to his credit. https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=lBbQ8FYAAAAJ&hl=en.

Lorika S. Beukes

Lorika S. Beukes obtained an honours degree in microbiology and an MSc in applied and environmental microbiology. She is currently on a PhD program in applied and environmental microbiology at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. She has an expertise in electron, confocal, and fluorescence microscopy. She works at the microscopy and microanalysis unit of the University of KwaZulu-Natal. Beukes has 12 publications to her credit. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lorika_Beukes2.


Received: 2016-05-28

Accepted: 2016-06-21

Published Online: 2016-09-24

Published in Print: 2016-12-01


Citation Information: Nanotechnology Reviews, Volume 5, Issue 6, Pages 507–520, ISSN (Online) 2191-9097, ISSN (Print) 2191-9089, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ntrev-2016-0039.

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