Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

Open Philosophy

Editor-in-Chief: Harman, Graham


Covered by:
DOAJ - Directory of Open Access Journals
ERIH PLUS

Open Access
Online
ISSN
2543-8875
See all formats and pricing
More options …

John Dewey’s Theory of Aesthetic Experience: Bridging the Gap Between Arts and Sciences

Raine Ruoppa
Published Online: 2019-03-22 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/opphil-2019-0007

Abstract

John Dewey’s philosophical pragmatism offers a reformatory approach to the arduous relationship between natural sciences and humanities. The crucial issue, which Dewey sets himself to resolve, is the pre-Darwinian influence of classical philosophy upon various scholarly practices. Ancient background assumptions still today permeate a considerable proportion of academic research and argumentation on both sides of the debate. Even evolutionary accounts appear to be affected. In order to avoid the often implicit, but nonetheless problematic, consequences that ensue from such archaic premises, I examine Dewey’s reappraisal of the concepts of art, science and knowledge. An analysis of these key concepts renders it possible to understand the proper function of aesthetic experience. In this paper, natural constitution of an aesthetic experience, which carries one of the intrinsic relations between art and science, comprises the core of the proposed solution. Furthermore, establishment of an integral aesthetic connection forms a fruitful basis for further bridging of the gap between hard sciences and humanities.

Keywords: philosophical naturalism; pragmatism; John Dewey; aesthetics; natural evolution; cultural evolution; philosophy of science; epistemology; philosophy of art

References

  • Dewey, John. The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953. Volume 1: 1925, Experience and Nature. Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S.A.; Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois, USA: InteLex Corp.; Southern Illinois University Press, 1985.Google Scholar

  • Dewey, John. The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953. Volume 10: 1934, Art as Experience. Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S.A.; Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois, USA: InteLex Corp.; Southern Illinois University Press, 1985.Google Scholar

  • Dewey, John. The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953. Volume 12: 1938, Logic: The Theory of Inquiry. Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S.A.; Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois, USA: InteLex Corp.; Southern Illinois University Press, 1985.Google Scholar

  • Dewey, John. The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953. Volume 4: 1929, The Quest for Certainty. Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S.A.; Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois, USA: InteLex Corp.; Southern Illinois University Press, 1985.Google Scholar

  • Dewey, John. The Middle Works of John Dewey, 1899-1924. Volume 12: 1920, Essays, Reconstruction in Philosophy. Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S.A.; Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois, USA: InteLex Corp.; Southern Illinois University Press, 1972.Google Scholar

  • Donald, Merlin. A Mind So Rare: The Evolution of Human Consciousness. 1st ed edn. New York (NY): W.W. Norton, 2001.Google Scholar

  • Franks, David D. “Why We Need Neurosociology as Well as Social Neuroscience: Or—Why Role-Taking and Theory of Mind Are Different Concepts.” In Handbook of Neurosociology, edited by David D. Franks and Jonathan H. Turner, 27-32. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2013.Google Scholar

  • Gadamer, Hans-Georg. Truth and Method. 2nd ed edn. London: Sheed and Ward, 1979Google Scholar

  • Hirn, Yrjö. The Origins of Art: A Psychological & Sociological Inquiry. London: MacMillan, 1900.Google Scholar

  • Määttänen, Pentti. “Emotions, Values, and Aesthetic Perception.” New Ideas in Psychology volume 47 (2017), 91-96.Google Scholar

  • Määttänen, Pentti. “Emotionally Charged Aesthetic Experience.” In Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Contributions To Phenomenology, vol. 73, edited by Scarinzi, Alfonsina, 85-99. Springer, Dordrecht, 2015.Google Scholar

  • Määttänen, Pentti. “Shusterman on Somatic Experience.” Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education. Volume 9, Issue 1 (2010), 55-66.Google Scholar

  • Määttänen, Pentti. Mind in Action: Experience and Embodied Cognition in Pragmatism. Cham: Springer, 2015.Web of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • Määttänen, Pentti. Action and Experience; A Naturalistic Approach to Cognition. Suomalainen Tiedeakatemia, 1993.Google Scholar

  • Popp, Jerome A. Evolution’s First Philosopher: John Dewey and the Continuity of Nature. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2007.Google Scholar

  • Rampley, Matthew. The Seductions of Darwin: Art, Evolution, Neuroscience. University Park, Pennsylvania: Penn State University Press, 2017.Google Scholar

  • Solymoski, Tibor. “Can the Two Cultures Reconcile? Reconstruction and Neuropragmatism.” In Handbook of Neurosociology, edited by David D. Franks and Jonathan H. Turner, 83-97. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2013.Google Scholar

  • Wright, Georg Henrik von. Explanation and Understanding. London: Routledge and K. Paul, 1971.Google Scholar

About the article

Received: 2018-09-11

Accepted: 2019-01-28

Published Online: 2019-03-22

Published in Print: 2019-01-01


Citation Information: Open Philosophy, Volume 2, Issue 1, Pages 59–74, ISSN (Online) 2543-8875, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/opphil-2019-0007.

Export Citation

© 2019 Raine Ruoppa, published by De Gruyter Open. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Public License. BY 4.0

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in