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Translating the Old Testament: Learning from the King James Bible

James E. Robson
Published Online: 2016-04-26 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/opth-2016-0015

Abstract

The Hebrew word “dabar” is translated in the King James Bible by no fewer than 82 different English words. This article explores how and why it is translated like this, considering some of the issues at stake in Bible translation more generally, and with the King James Bible, in particular. It examines more closely six ways in which translation decisions either affect interpretation or reveal the translation process. It draws out implications for translators, readers, and for evaluating the KJB.

Keywords: King James Bible; Hebrew; Old Testament; translation; dabar

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About the article


Received: 2015-12-09

Accepted: 2016-03-11

Published Online: 2016-04-26


Citation Information: Open Theology, ISSN (Online) 2300-6579, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/opth-2016-0015.

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©2016 James E. Robson. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. BY-NC-ND 3.0

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