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Open Theology

Editor-in-Chief: Taliaferro, Charles

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Conceptual Blending, the Second Naïveté, and the Emergence of New Meanings

Jason P. Roberts
Published Online: 2018-01-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/opth-2018-0003

Abstract

The field of cognitive linguistics has generated a powerful set of theoretical tools for analyzing the ways in which we understand, communicate, and create concepts. In the conceptual integration theory of Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner, the cognitive process known as double-scope blending provides a highdefinition model for the phenomenological hermeneutics of Paul Ricoeur. In particular, Ricoeur’s notion of developing a second naivete through the blending of ancient and contemporary worlds of meanings can be viewed as the double-scope integration of concepts across disparate conceptual frames. This re-modeling of Ricoeur’s hermeneutics gives it a new level of clarity and precision in cognitive scientific terms, which in turn may be utilized in service of theological and other forms of discourse. Conceptual integration theory also sheds light on other Ricoeur-inspired hermeneutical models and makes a case for the revelatory character of scripture through the meaning-making process of interpretation. The interpretation of the image of God concept in an evolutionary worldview serves as a heuristic example of second naivete as double-scope blending.

Keywords: Blending; Cognitive linguistics; Double-scope conceptual integration; Emergent meanings; Gilles Fauconnier; Hermeneutics; Mark Turner; Mental space; Paul Ricoeur

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About the article

Received: 2017-09-28

Accepted: 2017-11-24

Published Online: 2018-01-01


Citation Information: Open Theology, Volume 4, Issue 1, Pages 29–45, ISSN (Online) 2300-6579, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/opth-2018-0003.

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© 2018. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. BY-NC-ND 4.0

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