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Pure and Applied Chemistry

The Scientific Journal of IUPAC

Ed. by Burrows, Hugh / Stohner, Jürgen

12 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 5.294

CiteScore 2017: 3.42

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Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 1.546

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1365-3075
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Volume 79, Issue 12

Issues

Chemical evolution toward the origin of life

Daniel Fitz
  • Corresponding author
  • Division of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of General Inorganic and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Hannes Reiner
  • Corresponding author
  • Division of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of General Inorganic and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Bernd Michael Rode
  • Corresponding author
  • Division of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of General Inorganic and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2009-01-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1351/pac200779122101

Numerous hypotheses about how life on earth could have started can be found in the literature. In this article, we give an overview about the most widespread ones and try to point out which of them might have occurred on the primordial earth with highest probability from a chemical point of view. The idea that a very early stage of life was the "RNA world" encounters crucial problems concerning the formation of its building blocks and their stability in a prebiotic environment. Instead, it seems much more likely that a "peptide world" originated first and that RNA and DNA took up their part at a much later stage. It is shown that amino acids and peptides can be easily formed in a realistic primordial scenario and that these biomolecules can start chemical evolution without the help of RNA. The origin of biohomochirality seems strongly related to the most probable formation of the first peptides via the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction.

Keywords: amino acids; chemical evolution; origin of life; peptides; prebiotic chemistry

Conference

Eurasia Conference on Chemical Sciences, 9th, Antalya, Turkey, 2006-09-09–2006-09-13

References

About the article

Published Online: 2009-01-01

Published in Print: 2007-01-01


Citation Information: Pure and Applied Chemistry, Volume 79, Issue 12, Pages 2101–2117, ISSN (Online) 1365-3075, ISSN (Print) 0033-4545, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1351/pac200779122101.

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