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Polish Psychological Bulletin

The Journal of Committee for Psychological Sciences of Polish Academy of Sciences

4 Issues per year


CiteScore 2016: 0.33

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1641-7844
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Volume 40, Issue 4 (Jan 2009)

Issues

Links between Theory of Mind and Executive Function: Towards a More Comprehensive Model

Adam Putko
Published Online: 2010-01-14 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/s10059-009-0010-6

Links between Theory of Mind and Executive Function: Towards a More Comprehensive Model

This paper addresses the problem of relationships between the development of theory of mind (ToM) and executive function (EF). An overview of empirical findings leads to the conclusion that the complex picture of the relations between EF and ToM development may result from the intertwining of different types and levels of reciprocal influences. It is, on the one hand, the level of emergence-type vs. expressive-type influences, and, on the other hand, direct vs. indirect ones. Data from longitudinal and training studies suggest the asymmetry of reciprocal influences between EF and ToM, with the stronger impact of EF on ToM development, which supports the view that EF is a prerequisite of ToM development. A model is proposed that explains how different EF and ToM skills are involved in the specific types and levels of influences. The issue of disentangling in the analysis the different types of reciprocal impacts is also discussed.

Keywords: theory of mind; executive function; emergence account; expression account

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About the article


Published Online: 2010-01-14

Published in Print: 2009-01-01


Citation Information: Polish Psychological Bulletin, ISSN (Print) 0079-2993, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/s10059-009-0010-6.

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