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Pharmaceutical Technology in Hospital Pharmacy

Editor-in-Chief: Lagarce, Frédéric

Ed. by Crauste-Manciet, Sylvie

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Surface Contamination in a Teaching Hospital: A 6 Year Perspective

Christel Roland
  • Pharmacy Department and Pharmacy Practice Research Unit, CHU Sainte-Justine, 3175 Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1C5
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/ Johann-François Ouellette-Frève / Caroline Plante / Jean-François Bussières
  • Corresponding author
  • Pharmacy Department and Pharmacy Practice Research Unit, CHU Sainte-Justine, 3175 Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1C5
  • Full clinical professor, Faculty of Pharmacy, Montréal University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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Published Online: 2016-10-20 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/pthp-2016-0016

Abstract

Objective:

The aim of this paper is to review the surface contamination of three hazardous drugs within a teaching hospital and comment the different strategies put in place over the years in the context of these multicenter studies.

Background:

Many cross-sectional studies have been published about surface contamination with hazardous drugs in healthcare settings.

Methods:

This is a descriptive retrospective and longitudinal study. The study was conducted in a 500-bed mother-child university health center in Quebec, Canada.

Results:

A total of 72 samples (e. g. 36 in the pharmacy and 36 in outpatient care area) were obtained between 2010 and 2016 for a total of 216 analyses (three drugs/samples tested). The proportion of positive samples was 50 % (36/72) for cyclophosphamide, 32 % (23/72) for ifosfamide and 19 % (14/72) for methotrexate. The cyclophosphamide concentrations measured varied from undetectable to 400 pg/cm2. The ifosfamide concentrations measured varied from undetectable to 830 pg/cm2. The concentrations of methotrexate measured varied from undetectable to 660 pg/cm2.

Conclusion:

This study shows a longitudinal perspective of the surface contamination of hazardous drugs in a teaching mother-child hospital. Every hospital should review its annual scorecard of contamination with a longitudinal perspective to minimize drug contamination. It is possible to contain surface contamination with hazardous drugs with different strategies.

Keywords: hazardous drugs; surveillance; contamination; surfaces

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About the article

Christel Roland

Christel Roland is a Pharm.D candidate at Université de Lille. Currently, she is completing a residency at CHU Sainte-Justine and she is involved in environmental surveillance of hazardous drugs.

Johann-François Ouellette-Frève

Johann-François Ouellette-Frève, pharmacist, obtained his Pharm.D in 2011 and his Master of Science in advanced pharmacotherapy in 2012. He is currently pharmacist at the oncology clinic, pharmacist in charge of the cellular therapy program and the coordinator of the hemato-oncology pharmacy team including the operation of the pharmacy satellite.

Caroline Plante

Caroline Plante, nurses, obtained her baccalaureate in 1997 and her certification of Canadian nurses association specializes in oncology in 2011. She is currently a nurse educator at CHU Sainte-Justine hospital in the hematology, oncology department for 5 years.

Jean-François Bussières

Jean-François Bussières, pharmacist, obtained his B.Pharm in 1988 and his Master of Science in 1992 from Université Laval and his Masters of Business Administration from McGill Université de Montreal, in1992. In 1996, he became Director of the Pharmacy Department of CHU Sainte-Justine. In addition, he combines the functions of Director of the Pharmacy Practice Research Unit, Full Clinical professor at the Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal and Guest speaker at the Faculty of pharmacy at Université Laval. He received numerous awards for excellence, including the Louis-Hébert Award in 2000 from the Ordre des pharmaciens du Québec, the Innovation Award in 2013 from the same authority, the National Excellence in Education in 2016 from the Association of Faculties of Pharmacy in Canada and the International Leadership Award in 2016 from the Canadian Pharmacists Association.


Received: 2016-08-24

Revised: 2016-09-23

Accepted: 2016-09-24

Published Online: 2016-10-20

Published in Print: 2016-12-01


Conflicts of interest statement: The authors state no conflict of interest. They have read the journal’s publication ethics and publication malpractice statement available at the journal’s website and hereby confirm that they comply with all its parts applicable to the present scientific work.


Citation Information: Pharmaceutical Technology in Hospital Pharmacy, Volume 1, Issue 4, Pages 187–193, ISSN (Online) 2365-242X, ISSN (Print) 2365-2411, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/pthp-2016-0016.

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