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Review of Artistic Education

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13. Enhancing Music Listening in Educational Context

Dorina Iuşcă
  • Lecturer PhD, “George Enescu” University of Arts, Iași, Romania
  • Email:
Published Online: 2016-04-04 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/rae-2016-0013

Abstract

A growing body of research has shown the importance of music listening in psychological frameworks such as the construction of emotional and social identity. Nonetheless, the educational implications of this activity involve the way students use music listening for cultural development, cognitive processing and aesthetic reaction enhancement. The present study aims to review the relevant literature regarding how musical preference, a concept used mainly in music psychology, may be explored in educational contexts. Zajong’s (1968) theory of repeated exposure indicates that mere exposure to a stimulus is enough to create a favorable attitude towards it. This study investigates the experimental researches focused on the conditions where repeated exposure to academic music may generate the development of musical preference.

Keywords: music listening; musical preference; repeated exposure

References

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About the article

Published Online: 2016-04-04

Published in Print: 2016-03-01



Citation Information: Review of Artistic Education, ISSN (Online) 2501-238X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/rae-2016-0013. Export Citation

© 2016 Dorina Iuşcă, published by De Gruyter Open. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

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