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Reviews on Environmental Health

Editor-in-Chief: Carpenter, David O. / Sly, Peter

Editorial Board: Brugge, Doug / Edwards, John W. / Field, R.William / Garbisu, Carlos / Hales, Simon / Horowitz, Michal / Lawrence, Roderick / Maibach, H.I. / Shaw, Susan / Tao, Shu / Tchounwou, Paul B.

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IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 1.284

CiteScore 2017: 1.29

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 0.438
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 0.603

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2191-0308
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Volume 26, Issue 3

Issues

Planning for the North Carolina healthy homes initiative

Lindsay Ann Herendeen
  • University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Health Behavior and Health Education, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
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/ Amy MacDonald
  • University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Institute for the Environment, Environmental Resource Program, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
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Published Online: 2011-08-30 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh.2011.022

Abstract

Substandard housing conditions have been linked to widespread childhood environmental health ailments, including two of the leading causes of childhood morbidity: lead poisoning and asthma. In 2009, the United States Surgeon General called for action around healthy homes. Improving home health environments can alleviate the cycle of childhood morbidity and mortality. The North Carolina (NC) Department of Environment and Natural Resources Children’s Environmen­tal Health Branch is working to build capacity at the State level to expand the childhood lead poisoning prevention program to respond to additional in-home environmental health issues. To achieve this objective, North Carolina must consider recommendations for assessment, management, and evaluation. This paper will situate healthy homes on the national public health agenda; discuss ways that healthy homes programs address children’s environmental health disparities; introduce the NC Healthy Homes Initiative; explore current healthy housing efforts in North Carolina through an examination of the Guilford County Healthy Homes Initiative; and provide recommendations for the NC Healthy Homes Initiative to address children’s environmental health disparities.

Keywords: childhood environmental health; housing; North Carolina

About the article

Corresponding author: Lindsay Ann Herendeen, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Health Behavior and Health Education, 2412 Englewood Ave, Durham, NC 27705, USA Phone: +585-750-2155, Fax: +919-966-9920


Received: 2011-11-20

Accepted: 2011-02-20

Published Online: 2011-08-30

Published Online: 2011-08-20

Published in Print: 2011-09-01


Citation Information: Reviews on Environmental Health, Volume 26, Issue 3, Pages 149–154, ISSN (Online) 2191-0308, ISSN (Print) 0048-7554, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh.2011.022.

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