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Reviews on Environmental Health

Editor-in-Chief: Carpenter, David O. / Sly, Peter

Editorial Board: Brugge, Doug / Edwards, John W. / Field, R.William / Garbisu, Carlos / Hales, Simon / Horowitz, Michal / Lawrence, Roderick / Maibach, H.I. / Shaw, Susan / Tao, Shu / Tchounwou, Paul B.

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2191-0308
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Volume 29, Issue 1-2

Issues

Projected health impacts of heat events in Washington State associated with climate change

Tania Busch Isaksen
  • Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Michael Yost
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Elizabeth Hom
  • Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Richard Fenske
  • Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2014-03-22 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2014-0029

Abstract

Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and duration of extreme-heat events and associated health outcomes. This study used data from the historical heat-health outcome relationship, and a unique prediction model, to estimate mortality for 2025 and 2045. For each one degree change in humidex above threshold, we find a corresponding 1.83% increase in mortality for all ages, all non-traumatic causes of death in King County, Washington. Mortality is projected to increase significantly in 2025 and 2045 for the 85 and older age group (2.3–8.0 and 4.0–22.3 times higher than baseline, respectively).

Keywords: climate change; heat events; Pacific Northwest region

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About the article

Corresponding author: Michael Yost, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, E-mail:


Received: 2014-01-17

Accepted: 2014-01-17

Published Online: 2014-03-22

Published in Print: 2014-04-01


Citation Information: Reviews on Environmental Health, Volume 29, Issue 1-2, Pages 119–123, ISSN (Online) 2191-0308, ISSN (Print) 0048-7554, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2014-0029.

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