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Reviews on Environmental Health

Editor-in-Chief: Carpenter, David O. / Sly, Peter

Editorial Board: Brugge, Doug / Edwards, John W. / Field, R.William / Garbisu, Carlos / Hales, Simon / Horowitz, Michal / Lawrence, Roderick / Maibach, H.I. / Shaw, Susan / Tao, Shu / Tchounwou, Paul B.


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 1.616

CiteScore 2018: 1.69

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.508
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.664

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2191-0308
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Volume 31, Issue 1

Issues

Particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) personal exposure evaluation on mechanics and administrative officers at the motor vehicle testing center at Pulo Gadung, DKI Jakarta

Zuly Prima Rizky
  • Corresponding author
  • Public Health Faculty, Occupational Health and Safety Department, University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia
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  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Patricia Bebby Yolla
  • Public Health Faculty, Occupational Health and Safety Department, University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Doni Hikmat Ramdhan
  • Public Health Faculty, Occupational Health and Safety Department, University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia
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Published Online: 2016-03-04 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2015-0057

Abstract

Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in both the short and long term has been known to cause deaths and health effects, especially related to the heart, blood vessels, and lungs. Based on this information, researchers conducted this study at a motor vehicle testing center unit at Pulo Gadung, in Jarkarta, to determine the concentration of PM2.5 that workers were exposed to. The major source of PM2.5 in this area is from the exhaust of gas emissions from motor vehicles, which is one of the largest contributors to the levels of PM in urban areas. Ten mechanics were picked from 16 mechanics that work in this station. Four administration workers from different posts were also picked to participate. The researcher conducted the PM2.5 personal exposure measurement during weekdays from 6 to 14 April 2015 (2 workers/day). This research was conducted to measure the particle number concentration with size <2.5 μm. The average personal exposure concentrations of PM2.5 in the study period received by the group of mechanics amounted to 149.01 μm/m3 while the administrative officer group that consisted of four administrative workers were exposed to an average of 103.28 μm/m3. Once converted and compared with the World Health Organization Air Quality Guidelines, the PM2.5 exposure of the mechanics and administrative officers exceeded the recommended exposure (25 μm/m3).

Keywords: fine particles; personal exposure; PM2.5

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About the article

Corresponding author: Zuly Prima Rizky, Public Health Faculty, Occupational Health and Safety Department, University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, Phone: +(62) 813 1088 3667, E-mail:


Received: 2015-10-19

Accepted: 2015-10-21

Published Online: 2016-03-04

Published in Print: 2016-03-01


Citation Information: Reviews on Environmental Health, Volume 31, Issue 1, Pages 185–186, ISSN (Online) 2191-0308, ISSN (Print) 0048-7554, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2015-0057.

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